The Blog: See what
Sigma is saying.

01.13.2015

Over and over again I am asked how to get boudoir images that are a guaranteed sell. For me, it’s a simple equation. Shots you know work plus shots that you take a little risk on, equals sales! Here are 4 shots I am sure to get at every boudoir session and you should too!

1. THE HEADSHOT.

© 2014 Jen Rozenbaum | Lens: 24-105mm F4 DG OS HSM | Art | Shutter speed: 1/125 sec | Aperture: F4.0 | ISO: 640

© 2014 Jen Rozenbaum | Lens: 24-105mm F4 DG OS HSM | Art | Shutter speed: 1/125 sec | Aperture: F4.0 | ISO: 640

Every client wants a photo that they can show their friends, maybe even post on Facebook or Twitter. Something not too revealing, but of course edgier than an every day photo of themselves.  Better than a selfie, but not quite boudoir. These photos are not only popular with clients, but allows you the opportunity for a client to talk about you and show off your photos without feeling to exposed.

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01.05.2015

One Photographer’s Experience Using Sigma Lenses in Istanbul, Brussels, and Paris, Part I

By Eduardo Angel

© Eduardo Angel

© Eduardo Angel

I have recently returned from Istanbul, that fabled city that straddles two continents, Brussels, with its ancient roots and bilingual arrangement, and Paris, the legendary City of Light. These cities are famous for offering up a feast of imaging possibilities, and in this article I’ll share some of the things I considered before hitting the road on assignment, including my approach to lens selection.

Except for a few days in Istanbul where I had the priceless assistance of my talented friend Levent, I shot stills and video and recorded “soundscapes” by myself for three weeks using exclusively Sigma lenses.

To get started, one important limitation was that while I wanted to travel as light as possible, even though there’s nothing “light” when it comes to video gear, I still needed to have a full production and post-production setup with me.

This is not an easy challenge to meet, but it’s one that we increasingly face as digital visual storytellers. All the gear needed to fit in my trusted Tenba Roadie II Backpack so I could take it with me as carry-on luggage. It also had to be able to be taken on public transportation at each location if needed.

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01.05.2015

One Photographer’s Experience Using Sigma Lenses for video in Istanbul, Brussels, and Paris

By Eduardo Angel

For a recent assignment in Europe I chose a set of five Sigma lenses that would cover all the bases, no matter what type of shot I needed:

• 35mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art
• 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art
• 8-16mm F4.5-5.6 DC HSM
• 18-35mm F1.8 DC HSM | Art
• 24-105mm F4 DG OS HSM |Art

Image © Eduardo Angel.

All Images © Eduardo Angel.

For photographers and videographers new to Sigma, it takes a bit of work to navigate through Sigma’s nomenclature, but everything makes sense in the end. Based upon the format, Sigma assigns different designations for formats and image circles, as follows:

DG stands for “Digital Grade.” The coating on these lenses is optimized for full-frame DSLR systems.
DC stands for “Digital Compact.” These lenses are specifically designed for APS-C sensors.
DN stands for “Digital Neo.” The lenses under the DN designation are intended for mirrorless cameras interchangeable-lens cameras that feature either APS-C or Micro Four Thirds size sensors.

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