The Blog: See what
Sigma is saying.

01.22.2016

Just how tough are Sigma’s new Ceramic Protector filters? This video demonstrates the incredible performance of these exclusive filters for DSLR camera lenses.

 

Bounccee

Learn more about Sigma’s WR Clear Glass Ceramic Protector Filters!

01.20.2016

If you only had 8 seconds to shoot the perfect shot, which lens would you choose? When I had the opportunity to shoot the Attica Rodeo in Attica, NY, I immediately reached for my Sigma 120-300mm f2.8 Sport lens. I knew the action would be fast, I didn’t know what the lighting would be and there would most certainly be dirt and dust flying. The lens could handle all of it, even if the lighting was less than optimal. Fortunately, it was a beautiful late summer day, so I didn’t have any lighting curve balls thrown at me. What I wasn’t counting on being thrown at me came from a bulls rear end.

A good friend of mine, Brody Wheeler, an excellent photographer himself has been involved with the Attica Rodeo for years, along with several generations of his family. He was able to get me inside access that I may not have had otherwise.  I wanted to shoot down low with the action coming toward me to stack the subjects. The best vantage point to do this was from the bull riding shoot for the events that didn’t involve the bulls such as the calf roping, barrel racing and team penning.

© 2015 Steve Chesler | Shooting from a low angle with a wide aperture with the Sigma 120-300mm f2.8 Sport lens with the action coming toward me made for some dramatic images.

© 2015 Steve Chesler | Shooting from a low angle with a wide aperture with the Sigma 120-300mm f2.8 Sport lens with the action coming toward me made for some dramatic images.

Read More >>

01.15.2016

Guest post by Scott Bourne, founder of Photofocus.com

Cranes In The Fire Mist Photo Copyright Scott Bourne

Here’s the story of my image “Cranes in the Fire Mist” Photo © 2008 Scott Bourne. All rights reserved. 1/4000 F5.6 ISO 800, Sigma 300-800mm F5.6 EX DG HSM at 800mm on Nikon D3.

Around 20 years ago, I saw an image by a friend that contained a lake full of cranes and geese, backlit by a blazing, golden sun.

The image struck me to the point that I spent 12 years trying to re-create my own version of it.

In the image I pre-visualized, there would be one or two birds flying into the pond while the others waited to take off. It’s an almost impossible scenario because a number of factors have to converge in a perfect storm for it to work.

Read More >>

01.14.2016

Guest post by John DiGiacomo

1/3200 F2.8 ISO 10,000 at 155mm paired with Nikon D4. Photo by John DiGiacomo.

1/3200 F2.8 ISO 10,000 at 155mm paired with Nikon D4. Photo by John DiGiacomo.

As a professional photographer who covers winter sports, I am continually subjecting my equipment to extreme elements and challenging lighting conditions. These images from the Viesmann Luge World Cup Event, held in Lake Placid, NY are a small example. The event started several hours after sunset, in wintry conditions.

LP_Luge_WC_(2_of_3)

1/4000 F2.8 ISO 12,800 at 155mm paired with Nikon D4. Photo by John DiGiacomo.

With competitors reaching speeds in excess of 70mph and the track lit by sodium vapor lights, what’s a photographer to do to produce useable images? Knowing I would need a minimum shutter speed of 1/2500th to produce a sharp image, I needed to push the ISO on my Nikon D4 to 12,800 and shoot wide open with my Sigma 120-300mm F2.8 lens. Also, I knew that I would have to shoot in RAW and not JPG, as I needed the flexibility of tweaking the white balance and reducing noise.

1/4000 F3.5 ISO 1250  at 180mm paired with Nikon D4. Photo by John DiGiacomo.

1/4000 F3.5 ISO 1250 at 180mm paired with Nikon D4. Photo by John DiGiacomo.

With all these variables to consider, as well as the pressure of ensuring that I had a sharp image of every competitor the last thing I want to concern myself with is how is my equipment going to hold up to the elements. By the time the race concluded my Sigma 120-300mm F2.8 lens had ice forming on it, but I was confident that this would not be a problem thanks to its rugged design.

 

Check out more of John DiGiacomo’s work on his website!

01.13.2016

Sigma offers a pair of hyper-telephoto zoom lenses for full-frame cameras, the 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Sports and 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Contemporary. With identical focal length and apertures, and advanced feature sets including Sigma’s exclusive lens customization, these two new zoom lenses share champion DNA. What is the difference between the Sports and Contemporary version of the Sigma 150-600mm zoom lenses?

Caption: The 150-600mm Sports (top) and Contemporary (lower) lenses offer Sigma’s Exclusive Features including lens performance customization with the USB Dock.

Caption: The 150-600mm Sports (top) and Contemporary (lower) lenses offer Sigma’s Exclusive Features including lens performance customization with the USB Dock.

The Sports is the bigger of the two. Weighing in at 6.3 pounds, it has an aluminum alloy barrel, and a more weatherized build. 24 elements, including two FLD and three SLD element, are in 16 groups with super multi-layer coatings. Front filter size is 105mm. Street: $1999 ($1,799 Special Instant Savings through 1/31/16!)

© 2015 Robert O'Toole | Crossfox looking good against out of focus fireweed and grass. Sigma 150-600 Sports lens at 600mm and Nikon D810, 1/250s, f/8, ISO 1000, EV + .3, Manual mode with Auto-ISO, UniqBall UBH 45 head and Jobu Algonquin Carbon Tripod.

150-600mm | S © Robert O’Toole

The Contemporary is more compact at 4.3 pounds, and built with Thermally Stable Composite. 20 elements, including one FLD and three SLD elements, are in 16 groups with super multi-layer coatings. The rear element is water/oil resistant with mount gasketing. Filter filter size is 95mm. Street: $1089  (Special $989 Instant Savings through 1/31/16!)

Read More >>

01.05.2016

In the seventh episode of the Boudoir Photography Sessions, Sigma Pro Jen Rozenbaum explains how to bring out personality and emotion out of her clients. The Sigma 24-105mm F4 DG OS HSM | Art is an incredibly versatile lens to use in a tight quartered space like a hotel room.

Check out the images after the jump!

Read More >>

01.04.2016

Thanks to everyone who participated in our Sigma SuperFan Contest! As a company, it is incredible to see just how much Sigma lenses and cameras mean to so many photographers from all walks of life, from all corners of the globe. Young and older, longtime fans and recent converts, we truly appreciated hearing from all of you!

We had photographers tell us about positive their experiences dealing with the Sigma family on the phone, in person, at events and trade show, and on line. We had fans share great customer service stories, and about their interaction with our dedicated teams of tech reps and pros at giant trade shows and smaller, personalized events.

Read More >>

01.04.2016

Aquariums present a number of challenges for photographers hoping to make keepsake photos of a visit to view undersea animals. Between the dim lighting conditions, highly reflective surfaces, and active subjects, it can be a recipe for disappointment. Here are some tips and tricks to up the odds of landing a winning shot of sharks and other aquatic animals the next time you visit the aquarium.

Eye contact with a shark at the Adventure Aquarium. Sigma 24-35mm F2 DG HSM | Art at 24mm. 1/80 F2 at ISO 1600. RAW photo worked up in Adobe Camera Raw. We'll go into the full workup later in this piece.

When it all comes together: Great Eye contact with a shark at the Adventure Aquarium from the Shark Tunnel.  Sigma 24-35mm F2 DG HSM | Art at 24mm. 1/80 F2 at ISO 1600. RAW photo worked up in Adobe Camera Raw. We’ll go into the full workup later in this piece.

Pack a fast-aperture wide angle lens

For my visit to the Adventure Aquarium, I chose the Sigma 24-35mm F2 DG HSM | Art lens as my go-to lens for almost all the photos in this piece. The wide-angle field of view and very fast F2 aperture allowed for fast shutter speeds in the ever-changing interior lighting conditions both inside and outside the giant tanks.

The Sigma 24-35mm F2 is the world's first F2 full-frame zoom lens.

The Sigma 24-35mm F2 is the world’s first F2 full-frame zoom lens.

Other great lens options include the full-frame 24mm F1.4 DG HSM | A, 24-70mm F2.8 EX, and the 17-70mm F2.8-4.0 DC OS HSM | C and the 18-35mm F1.8 DC HSM | Art lenses for APS-C cameras like the Canon Rebel Series, 7D, and DX-format Nikon DSLRs. If you don’t have a super-fast lens in your bag, make sure you are shooting with your kit zoom as wide open as it will go, usually F3.5, for the most light-gathering power.

Read More >>

12.29.2015

It’s been five years since I began my Curious Critters photographic series, and a lot has happened. Here’s a quick five-year review and an update on All-Things-Critters over the last 12 months.

In late 2010 my Curious Critters images debuted at the Telluride Photo Festival as a 24-image exhibit in the historic Sheridan Opera House Gallery. In 2011, the first Curious Critters children’s picture book launched, garnering six national book awards and selling over 100,000 copies. Last year saw the launch of the second book, Curious Critters Volume Two.

Giant Pacific Octopus, Alaska SeaLife Center, Seward, Alaska. Nikon D800E. Sigma 105mm f/2.8 OS macro lens. f/16, 1/250 second, ISO 200. Two Dynalite Strobes, two Lastolite 4'x6' panels. Photo © 2015 David FitzSimmons. All rights reserved.

Giant Pacific Octopus, Alaska SeaLife Center, Seward, Alaska. Nikon D800E. Sigma 105mm f/2.8 OS macro lens. f/16, 1/250 second, ISO 200. Two Dynalite Strobes, two Lastolite 4’x6′ panels. Photo © 2015 David FitzSimmons. All rights reserved.

Read More >>

12.22.2015

Exactly what makes Katmai Alaska such a special place for wildlife photographers? After all huge storms routinely sweep in from the gulf of Alaska with little warning and the animals, from the tinniest of insects to the largest bear, are in charge and humans are not at the top of the food chain. Getting around by air or sea is the only way to go and its expensive and unreliable. With the weather issues, dangerous inhabitants and difficulties getting around why do I keep going back for ten years straight? The photographic opportunities of course!

© 2015 Robert O'Toole | Juvenile brown bear playing in a field of fireweed, Hallo Bay, Katmai, Alaska. Sigma 150-600 Sports lens at 600mm and Nikon D810, 1/000s, f/6.3, ISO 2000, EV + .7, Manual mode with Auto-ISO, UniqBall UBH 45 head and Jobu Algonquin Carbon Tripod.

© 2015 Robert O’Toole | Juvenile brown bear playing in a field of fireweed, Hallo Bay, Katmai, Alaska. Sigma 150-600 Sports lens at 600mm and Nikon D810, 1/000s, f/6.3, ISO 2000, EV + .7, Manual mode with Auto-ISO, UniqBall UBH 45 head and Jobu Algonquin Carbon Tripod.

This juvenile bear and its sibling played in field of fireweed for almost an hour. This is the kind of opportunity that will always keep me coming back for more.

Read More >>