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Tag: Nature Photography
11.05.2013

Morning at the Reflection Lakes, Mount Rainier National Park

Stormy Monday

Late every summer, nature photographers flock to the Pacific Northwest with the hope of capturing the majestic beauty of Mount Rainier and its gorgeous subalpine meadows. After much obsessive planning and conversations with photographers around Washington State, I was able to make my first trip to the region this year. My biggest concern was whether I would arrive on time to catch the peak wildflower bloom. The area experienced a warm spring and summer, and thus the wildflowers emerged earlier than expected. But, as luck would have it, that shouldn’t have been my primary worry.

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09.10.2013

Macro Photography: How Sensor Format Affects Image Depth of Field

© 2013 Robert OToole Photography | Lens: Sigma Macro 150mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM |  Camera: NIKON D800E | ISO: 100 | Aperture: f8 | Shutter speed: 1/250 sec | single SB-R200 flash. This flower was framed in the viewfinder with a full frame sensor format body in FX (full frame) mode.

One of the biggest challenges with macro photography is working with a limited depth of field or DOF. When I am shooting macro I am always trying to make sure the subject and elements in the frame appear sharp by adjusting the aperture and making sure the important elements in image fall on the plane of focus by adjusting my angle of view. But there is another important element that has a huge effect on DOF that most people don’t even know about, how a different sensor format can and will effect the depth of field in your image. Moving to a smaller sensor format at the same apparent magnification will give you lots more DOF to work with in your macro images.

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09.04.2013

Making the Best of Opportunities in Nature Photography

As photographers, we often strive for that “perfect” image. Those who are most proficient in their art, in one way or another, pre-visualize the final photograph and strive to exercise the most possible control over all the variables involved in achieving the desired end result. The reality is that outside of the studio and particularly true in nature photography, all bets are off. The extensive planning and meticulous research performed prior to photographing a never before visited location may prove useful or lead to a near-fruitless and frustrating trip. The landscape artist cannot control light and precipitation and is always at the mercy of Mother Nature. Sometimes you have to come to terms with the fact that the iconic shot you saw in someone else’s portfolio will probably not be in yours. This is where you have the chance to prove your worth as a photographer by using your imagination and compositional skills to improvise and make the most out of the presented opportunities.

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08.28.2013

HDR Photography + Focus Stacking

“Wild Chervil at Sunrise, Kelleys Island, Ohio.” Photographed during the 3rd Annual sponsored Island Photo Adventure photo workshop sponsored by Sigma. Nikon D800E. Sigma 35mm F1.4 DG HSM. f/16. 1/15 second. ISO 100.  Nikon cable release. Gitzo GT2541EX tripod and GH2780QR ball head. This image was processed using both Helicon Focus stacking software and Photomatix Pro HDR software. Photo © 2013 David FitzSimmons. All rights reserved.

In my workshops and presentations over the past few years, I have discussed my extensive use of two powerful software packages: Helicon Focus and Photomatix. Helicon Focus stacks multiple images, each focused on different planes, creating one super-focused image. Photomatix combines multiple images photographed with different exposure values, creating one file with a super-wide exposure range.

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08.14.2013

The Difference of One F-Stop

© 2013 David FitzSimmons | Wild Geranium F-Stop Study Animated GIF. The Botanic Garden at Smith College, Northampton, MA, USA. Sigma SD1 Merrill. Sigma 150mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM APO Macro. Sigma remote. Gitzo GT2541EX tripod and GH2780QR ball head.

In conjunction with Sigma and Hunt’s Photo, I recently lead a garden photography workshop at The Botanic Garden of Smith College in Northampton, MA. There and anywhere I lead a workshop dealing with macro photography, I always stress the importance of choosing your f-stops wisely.

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08.08.2013

The Magic of Iceland

© 2013 Roman Kurywczak | For the foreground: Sigma 12-24mm | Focal Length: 12 mm | ISO: 100 | Aperture:  f/22 | Shutter speed: 1/3 sec. For the sky: Sigma 12-24mm | Focal Length: 12mm | ISO: 100 | Aperture: f/22 | Shutter speed: 1/5 sec.

Iceland has long been on my list of photography destinations so I was very excited to finally get a chance to explore the country as well as try out the Sigma 12-24mm. The landscapes were just breathtaking and I got an opportunity to photograph the many waterfalls of the country. The lens quickly proved itself as I was able to compose and recompose quickly given that I was often very close to the falls! One of my favorites is a triple waterfall near Mt. Kirkjufell (shown above). While I normally use split neutral density filters to balance a scene, I decided instead to blend two exposures (one for the sky and one for the foreground) because of the mountain protruding on the right hand side. A split ND filter would have unnaturally darkened Mt. Kirkjufell so an exposure blend was the best option in this case.

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07.25.2013

Experimenting with Polarizer Filters

A polarizer filter helped bring out the blue sky in this shot taken during the Sigma FitzSimmons Photography Island Adventure photo workshop on Kelleys Island, Ohio. By turning my polarizer, I was able to bring out the blue skies over Lake Erie. Sigma SD1 Merrill. Sigma 10-20mm F4-5.6 EX DC HSM lens set at 18mm. f/11, 1/15 sec. ISO 100. Sigma 77mm Circular DG Polarizer Filter. Gitzo GT2451EX tripod with Gitzo ball head. Processed in Sigma Photo Pro 5.5, optimized in Adobe Photoshop CS5, NIK Viveza plug-in applied. Photo © 2013 David FitzSimmons. All rights reserved.

It’s pretty well known that a polarizer filter may deepen the color of blue skies, but the more subtle effects of a polarizer are often less known–and certainly worth exploring.

Polarizers limit the light that penetrates through them. As such, they help reduce contrast. Polarizers are like prison bars, where the light bouncing up and down through the bars passes through, but the light waves traveling horizontally do not. Of course, polarizing filters can be rotated, changing which directional light reaches a camera’s sensor and which does no

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07.24.2013

Sigma 15mm F2.8 EX DG Diagonal Fisheye lens

© 2013 Gabby Salazar | Indian pipe, a parasitic plant, grows on the forest floor at Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, Pennsylvania. Lens: Sigma 15mm F2.8 EX DG Diagonal Fisheye | Shutter speed: 1/50 sec | Aperture:  f/10 | ISO 800

I have always wanted a fisheye lens and have always talked myself out of the purchase, confident that it would gather dust when the novelty wore off. Recently, after becoming interested in wide-angle macro photography, I bit the bullet and got the Sigma 15mm F2.8 EX DG Diagonal Fisheye. It’s now been two months and I honestly can’t put the lens down. A few weeks ago, my dad commented that my worldview is becoming warped and I hope he was just referring to the pleasing distortion in all my recent images.

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07.23.2013

Nature Photography with the Sigma SD1 Merrill

© 2013 Alex Filatov | Camera: SD1 Merrill | 24-70mm F2.8 EX DG HSM | Shutter speed: 1/25 sec | Focal length: 24mm | Aperture: f16 | ISO: 100

When Sigma offered me the chance to shoot with the flagship SD1 Merrill DSLR, I jumped on the opportunity to extensively explore the abilities of the Foveon X3 censor at the heart of the camera. Knowing that my plans involved photographing the natural beauty of the mountainous American West allowed for the selection of several lenses from Sigma’s fine catalog most suited for that purpose – the 8-16mm F4.5-5.6 DC HSM wide angle, the 24-70mm F2.8 IF EX DG HSM mid range zoom and the 120-300mm F2.8 EX DG OS APO HSM telephoto.

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07.02.2013

Wildlife Photography with the 120-300mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM

© 2013 Roman Kurywczak |

I have been looking for an intermediate telephoto zoom lens to add to my lens arsenal. I have owned the Canon 100-400mm lens for a while now but I have never been happy with its sharpness or overall performance and the push pull mechanism for zooming was not very smooth and made tracking while zooming difficult. I was looking at 70-200mm f/2.8 lenses but I felt that I wanted a bit more reach for an intermediate telephoto zoom lens. Someone suggested that I try out the Sigma 120-300 f/2.8 and it looked to be a great idea as it fit nicely in my lens lineup between my wide angle lenses that ranged up to 128mm and my super telephoto Sigma 300-800mm f/5.6 lens.

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