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Tag: Filters
01.22.2016

Sigma Ceramic Protector Filter Drop Test demonstration video

Just how tough are Sigma’s new Ceramic Protector filters? This video demonstrates the incredible performance of these exclusive filters for DSLR camera lenses.

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12.16.2015

Sigma WR Ceramic Glass Filter Video demonstration!

We have just announced the world’s first highly shock-resistant and scratch-resistant clear glass ceramic protective filter, the WR Ceramic Protector! Check out this video to get a feel for just how strong this new glass protective filter is!

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02.02.2015

Why Circular Polarizers Still Matter

Why circular polarizers still matter: A high quality circular polarizer is still one of the most important accessories for any photographer’s bag. And the new Sigma Weather-resistant Circular Polarizers offer incredible performance, weather-tough design, and a fantastically upgraded case with grip arcs that keep the filters from rattling around in the bag.

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10.07.2014

Are Filters Still Relevant In Today’s Landscape Photography? Part 2

In part one we discussed the use of polarizers and solid neutral density filters. So what other filter should you have in your bag? The answer is: the graduated split neutral density (ND) filter. What do they do? They allow you to balance the light on the foreground with the tonality and brightness of the sky. How? The filter is split in half with the top being much darker and the bottom half clear. The dark area is graduated down towards the middle, which allows you to darken the sky and better match it up with the tonality of the foreground.

They generally come in 2 styles; one with a hard edge and the other is often referred to a soft edge. The hard edge has a clearly defined line where the soft edge is more graduated. This is the one I prefer and use most of the time. A variety I also have is called a reverse graduated neutral density filter (both made by Singh Ray) where the darkest area is towards the middle which makes it particularly useful as the sun comes up or is about to set. It is best suited for situations where you have a pretty level horizon without many protrusions into the sky. Below is an example of both and they typically come in increments from 1stop all the way up to 5 or more. Most practical are the 2 and 3 stop versions from numerous manufacturers. Notice that I am not recommending any screw in type as what you want to darken is seldom in the middle of the frame.

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10.06.2014

Are Filters Still Relevant In Today’s Landscape Photography? Part 1

This simple answer is absolutely yes! While they may not be as important as they were in the film days, […]

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07.25.2013

Experimenting with Polarizer Filters

It’s pretty well known that a polarizer filter may deepen the color of blue skies, but the more subtle effects of a polarizer are often less known–and certainly worth exploring.

Polarizers limit the light that penetrates through them. As such, they help reduce contrast. Polarizers are like prison bars, where the light bouncing up and down through the bars passes through, but the light waves traveling horizontally do not. Of course, polarizing filters can be rotated, changing which directional light reaches a camera’s sensor and which does no

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