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Tag: ultrawide
09.02.2014

Somewhat Secret Superpowers of Camera lenses

Everyone knows supertelephoto zoom lenses are great for long-reach photography at widest, like wild birds. Here, the Sigma 150-500mm is trained on an American Anhinga, at 500mm, wide open at F6.3.

The greatest thing about interchangeable camera lenses is the variety of optical designs, from ultrawide to supertelephoto and everything in between, that offer an incredible amount of variety for visual expression, creativity, and optical performance optimized for different photographic situations. And while it may be sometimes completely and totally obvious what types of photography a certain lens excels at—for example, everyone knows that Macros are designed to capture close-up details; telephoto lenses are great for long-reach wildlife and sports from the sidelines—many styles of camera lenses have lesser-known secret superpowers that can be called upon to make a photo. Let’s take a look!

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12.30.2013

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula with the Sigma 12-24mm lens

© 2013 Roman Kurywczak | Lens: Sigma 12-24mm | Focal length: 12mm | Aperture: f/22 | Shutter speed: 13 sec. on foreground and 1.6 sec. for the sky manually merged | ISO 100 on tripod

I had the opportunity to spend a few days in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.  I was doing some presentations in Kalamazoo […]

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11.27.2013

Sigma Holiday Gift Guide 2013: Our Pros Top Picks

For this year’s gift guide, we asked our Sigma Pros to recommend some of their favorite gear. This crew of amazingly talented and hard-working photographers each focuses on a different specialty and has their own individual style, and they’ve all got their favorite Sigma gear. Check out these great reasons why our pros choose to use Sigma lenses and cameras.

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11.19.2013

Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Park: a nature photographer’s mecca.

©2013 Roman M. Kurywczak | Lens: Sigma 12-24mm | Focal length: 21mm | Aperture:  f/20 | Shutter speed: 1.0 sec | ISO 400 on tripod

Yellowstone National Park and Grand Teton National Park have to be the premier nature photography location in the lower 48 states. Subjects range from stunning and otherworldly landscapes to abundant free roaming wildlife. The best time to visit the parks is either in early spring (June) or my favorite time of year in late September to early October as the leaves start to change. The large summer crowds are gone and the park takes on a much slower pace, as it gets ready for the approaching winter. The image above is of the Teton Range just off the outside road. This image is at first light and I used a Singh-Ray, 3 stop, reverse graduated neutral density filter to help balance the foreground with the much lighter sky and mountain range.

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10.22.2013

“Go Wide”- Utilizing Extreme Wide Angle Lenses for Impact

© 2013 Lindsay Adler | Lens: Sigma 12-24mm| Camera: Canon 5D Mark II | Focal Length: 21 | Shutter speed: 1/100 sec | Aperture: f/5.6 | ISO: 400

One way to create eye-catching imagery is to break the rules. When you shatter these rules, you stop people in their tracks! One of the first rules of portrait and fashion photography I learned was to NOT use a wide angle lens when photographing people. I was told this would distort their features and be unflattering to the model. But what if you use the wide angle on purpose to distort and exaggerate a scene? Then it creates visual interest and impact. Now your images stand out and become memorable.

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08.08.2013

The Magic of Iceland

© 2013 Roman Kurywczak | For the foreground: Sigma 12-24mm | Focal Length: 12 mm | ISO: 100 | Aperture:  f/22 | Shutter speed: 1/3 sec. For the sky: Sigma 12-24mm | Focal Length: 12mm | ISO: 100 | Aperture: f/22 | Shutter speed: 1/5 sec.

Iceland has long been on my list of photography destinations so I was very excited to finally get a chance to explore the country as well as try out the Sigma 12-24mm. The landscapes were just breathtaking and I got an opportunity to photograph the many waterfalls of the country. The lens quickly proved itself as I was able to compose and recompose quickly given that I was often very close to the falls! One of my favorites is a triple waterfall near Mt. Kirkjufell (shown above). While I normally use split neutral density filters to balance a scene, I decided instead to blend two exposures (one for the sky and one for the foreground) because of the mountain protruding on the right hand side. A split ND filter would have unnaturally darkened Mt. Kirkjufell so an exposure blend was the best option in this case.

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05.03.2013

Fan Photo of the Week: Brian Drourr’s Zen Barn

This week’s Fan Photo of the Week was made by Brian Drourr in Vermont with the Sigma 10-20mm F4-5.6 lens. Click to read the full article.

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04.30.2013

10-20mm f3.5 DC HSM: A must have lens for the outdoor sports shooter

©2013 Liam Doran | Sharp, light, fast and tough…the 10-20f3.5 makes it in the pack for multiday expeditions. Focal length: 10mm | Shutter speed: 1/800 sec | Aperture: F6.3 | ISO: 200

One of the benefits for outdoor sports shooters on APS-C sensors is the gain in reach with telephotos lenses. The negative of course is that now your wide angle 16mm is now not so wide at 25.6mm. Thankfully Sigma has a great wide-angle lens perfect for crop sensor shooters…the 10-20mm f3.5! I picked up this lens about a year ago and have shot outdoor sports and adventure travel with it extensively.

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03.28.2013

Fan Photo of the Week: Liam Doran’s Aspen Glades Rock Jump

Photo by Liam Doran. The Sigma 10-20 accentuates this image by making the skier look like he is much higher off the ground than he is and gives the viewer a great sense of place as it shows the aspens both vertically and horizontally.

This week’s Fan Photo of the Week was made by Liam Doran with the Sigma 10-20mm F3.5 EX DG HSM lens

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10.12.2012

Treat yourself to Cool Halloween Shots with these Tricks and Tips

Halloween can be an amazing time to make all sorts of cool photos. Between the Jack O’Lanterns, people of all ages in silly or scary costumes, and haunted houses, there’s something great to shoot pretty much everywhere you turn.It’s also a great time of year to throw so many of the hard and fast guidelines of photography aside and have some fun by breaking some rules, and employing some cool photo tricks to make Halloween photos that’ll turn some heads. In this blog posting, we’re going to have some fun and give you some ideas on how to capture the spirit of the season.

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