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Tag: Nature Photography
12.30.2013

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula with the Sigma 12-24mm lens

© 2013 Roman Kurywczak | Lens: Sigma 12-24mm | Focal length: 12mm | Aperture: f/22 | Shutter speed: 13 sec. on foreground and 1.6 sec. for the sky manually merged | ISO 100 on tripod

I had the opportunity to spend a few days in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.  I was doing some presentations in Kalamazoo […]

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12.26.2013

Rivers as Lines

Photography is all about abstraction. As you reduce three-dimensional scenes into two-dimensional photographs, your world flattens and becomes filled with […]

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12.20.2013

Bird photography at Bosque del Apache with Sigma’s 120-300mm f/2.8 lens

Sigma 120-300mm f/2.8 EX DG IF HSM APO and 1.4x DG EX APO Teleconverter @ 420mm, Nikon D800E, 1/25th s at f/5.6, ISO 220,  Auto-ISO, manual exposure mode, +1 EV, handheld. ©2013 Robert O'Toole

Bosque del Apache is a National Wildlife refuge is a very popular nature photography hot spot in New Mexico. Photographers […]

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11.19.2013

Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Park: a nature photographer’s mecca.

©2013 Roman M. Kurywczak | Lens: Sigma 12-24mm | Focal length: 21mm | Aperture:  f/20 | Shutter speed: 1.0 sec | ISO 400 on tripod

Yellowstone National Park and Grand Teton National Park have to be the premier nature photography location in the lower 48 states. Subjects range from stunning and otherworldly landscapes to abundant free roaming wildlife. The best time to visit the parks is either in early spring (June) or my favorite time of year in late September to early October as the leaves start to change. The large summer crowds are gone and the park takes on a much slower pace, as it gets ready for the approaching winter. The image above is of the Teton Range just off the outside road. This image is at first light and I used a Singh-Ray, 3 stop, reverse graduated neutral density filter to help balance the foreground with the much lighter sky and mountain range.

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11.14.2013

Macro Flash Photography: Create Natural Looking Macro Images

©2013 Robert O'Toole | Exposure mode: Manual mode | Shutter speed: 1/200th sec | Aperture: f8 | ISO 200 |  flash @ 1/40 output level | Lens: Sigma 105mm f/2.8 OS macro lens

One of the most important rules for macro flash photography is balance. For natural looking macro images you have to balance the ambient light and flash output. When the flash and ambient light are balanced the use of flash will not even be apparent to the viewer.

The problem is that with flash output overpowering the natural light in background it will underexpose and go dark, in some cases like the image below, it can underexpose to the point that is appears black.

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11.05.2013

Morning at the Reflection Lakes, Mount Rainier National Park

Stormy Monday

Late every summer, nature photographers flock to the Pacific Northwest with the hope of capturing the majestic beauty of Mount Rainier and its gorgeous subalpine meadows. After much obsessive planning and conversations with photographers around Washington State, I was able to make my first trip to the region this year. My biggest concern was whether I would arrive on time to catch the peak wildflower bloom. The area experienced a warm spring and summer, and thus the wildflowers emerged earlier than expected. But, as luck would have it, that shouldn’t have been my primary worry.

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09.10.2013

Macro Photography: How Sensor Format Affects Image Depth of Field

© 2013 Robert OToole Photography | Lens: Sigma Macro 150mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM |  Camera: NIKON D800E | ISO: 100 | Aperture: f8 | Shutter speed: 1/250 sec | single SB-R200 flash. This flower was framed in the viewfinder with a full frame sensor format body in FX (full frame) mode.

One of the biggest challenges with macro photography is working with a limited depth of field or DOF. When I am shooting macro I am always trying to make sure the subject and elements in the frame appear sharp by adjusting the aperture and making sure the important elements in image fall on the plane of focus by adjusting my angle of view. But there is another important element that has a huge effect on DOF that most people don’t even know about, how a different sensor format can and will effect the depth of field in your image. Moving to a smaller sensor format at the same apparent magnification will give you lots more DOF to work with in your macro images.

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09.04.2013

Making the Best of Opportunities in Nature Photography

As photographers, we often strive for that “perfect” image. Those who are most proficient in their art, in one way or another, pre-visualize the final photograph and strive to exercise the most possible control over all the variables involved in achieving the desired end result. The reality is that outside of the studio and particularly true in nature photography, all bets are off. The extensive planning and meticulous research performed prior to photographing a never before visited location may prove useful or lead to a near-fruitless and frustrating trip. The landscape artist cannot control light and precipitation and is always at the mercy of Mother Nature. Sometimes you have to come to terms with the fact that the iconic shot you saw in someone else’s portfolio will probably not be in yours. This is where you have the chance to prove your worth as a photographer by using your imagination and compositional skills to improvise and make the most out of the presented opportunities.

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08.28.2013

HDR Photography + Focus Stacking

“Wild Chervil at Sunrise, Kelleys Island, Ohio.” Photographed during the 3rd Annual sponsored Island Photo Adventure photo workshop sponsored by Sigma. Nikon D800E. Sigma 35mm F1.4 DG HSM. f/16. 1/15 second. ISO 100.  Nikon cable release. Gitzo GT2541EX tripod and GH2780QR ball head. This image was processed using both Helicon Focus stacking software and Photomatix Pro HDR software. Photo © 2013 David FitzSimmons. All rights reserved.

In my workshops and presentations over the past few years, I have discussed my extensive use of two powerful software packages: Helicon Focus and Photomatix. Helicon Focus stacks multiple images, each focused on different planes, creating one super-focused image. Photomatix combines multiple images photographed with different exposure values, creating one file with a super-wide exposure range.

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08.14.2013

The Difference of One F-Stop

© 2013 David FitzSimmons | Wild Geranium F-Stop Study Animated GIF. The Botanic Garden at Smith College, Northampton, MA, USA. Sigma SD1 Merrill. Sigma 150mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM APO Macro. Sigma remote. Gitzo GT2541EX tripod and GH2780QR ball head.

In conjunction with Sigma and Hunt’s Photo, I recently lead a garden photography workshop at The Botanic Garden of Smith College in Northampton, MA. There and anywhere I lead a workshop dealing with macro photography, I always stress the importance of choosing your f-stops wisely.

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