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Tag: Zoom Lens

The Sigma 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Contemporary versus the 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Sports

The Sigma 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Contemporary lens has a removable tripod collar. When the collar is removed, there is a rubberized ring that slides into place to cover the mounting bolts for a better hand-held experience. Sigma is rethinking lenses. From the innovative zoom lock at all marked focal distances, to lens customization for AF speed, custom focus limiter and more, the 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Contemporary is a fantastic hyper-tele zoom lens designed with an eye on portability and performance.

Last year, Sigma announced a pair of zoom lenses for full-frame cameras, the 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Sports and 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Contemporary. With identical focal lengths and apertures, and advanced feature sets including the Sigma-exclusive lens customization, these two new champion zoom lenses share a significant amount of DNA. So, what is the difference between the Sports and Contemporary version of the Sigma 150-600mm zoom lenses?



Sigma 150-600mm F5-6.3 | Sports: Hands-On

The Sigma 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Sports has been generating a ton of buzz since its announcement at photokina in September 2014. This Sports update of the 150-500mm supertelephoto zoom lens is one of two 150-600mm zoom lenses announced at the show, along with the 150-600mm DG OS HSM | Contemporary.



Sigma 18-300mm F3.5-6.3 | Contemporary: Hands-On

The Sigma 18-300mm F3.5-6.3 DC OS HSM Macro | Contemporary is the newest all-in-one camera lens in the Sigma lineup, and offers a high 16.6x zoom ratio, 1:3 macro magnification, Optical Stabilizer, in a lens that covers wide angle to supertelephoto in a single, lightweight lens.



Sigma Global Vision: The Journey Continues

The Sigma 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Sports lens is one of the newest lenses in the Sigma line, announced at photokina 2014. This lens is designed for exceptional outdoor performance.

What a difference a couple of years makes!

Two years ago, we were gearing up for PhotoPlus, just days after the announcement of the Sigma Global Vision at photokina 2012. We were preparing ourselves for discussions and briefings to explain the philosophy behind the three new lines being offered.

At that time, many photographers and technical editors were confused as to what Art, Sports, and Contemporary was meant to convey in a lens name. We spent a lot of time that fall explaining the way that Sigma is rethinking lenses and how this relates to the three new lens markings.



New York Whale Watching with the Sigma 150-500mm

© 2014 Mike Busch

New York Whale Watching with the Sigma 150-500mm F5-6.3 lens. Top tips for capturing great photos of humpback whales off New York City.



Video Quicktips for Photographers

Our new video quicktips for photographers series offers advice for anyone who is looking to understand more about the techniques and technology that can help them make better pictures. Each episode is just a few minutes long and looks to explain and offer advice in an easy-to-grasp way. Check back all month long as we add new episodes to this series.



Great Camera Gear Ideas for the Summer Season from Sigma!

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Great gear ideas for the summer, from the team at Sigma. Ideas for cameras and lenses for wherever you’re heading this sunny season!



Photographing in Manual Mode to create Beautiful Exposures

©Judy Host 2014 | Lens: 70-200mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM | Aperture: F 7.1 | Shutter speed: 1/320sec | ISO 320 | Focal length 80mm| Exposure: manual mode | Processed in Photoshop using Perfectly Clear by Authentic to add a bright and more saturated look.

Learning to use manual settings in your camera will provide you with the ability to create the beautiful exposures you desire. The exposure in your camera is determined by several different settings. Exposure refers to the lightness or darkness of the image. The settings are: 1) the aperture, the lens opening, which lets in light and controls the depth of field; 2) the shutter speed, the speed by which the lens lets in light, and 3) the ISO, which controls the camera’s sensitivity to light. The right combination of these three settings will give you a nearly perfect exposure and give you the effect you want for your image.



High Concept Photography

An example of a high concept image, this depiction of McClures Beach at Point Reyes National Seashore rises above the literal, conveying ethereal mood through a dream-like representation of sunset. Nikon D2X. Sigma 10-20mm f/4-5.6 EX DC HSM lens. f/16, .5 second. ISO 100. Sigma Circular DG Polarizer Filter. Gitzo GT2451EX tripod with Gitzo ball head. Photo © David FitzSimmons. All rights reserved.

In “The High Concept Image,” a recent feature in Outdoor Photographer, nature photographer Ian Plant intelligently challenges photographers to capture creative, thoughtful images that move beyond “snapshots,” rising to the level of “art.”

Ian’s description of the high concept image is in contradistinction to the “low-concept image,” which he points out is generally more “documentary” or “literal” in nature. Seeing nothing wrong with such grab shots, he does, however, push photographers to look for new ways to depict the world. He invokes legendary photographer Minor White, who once said “One should photograph objects not only for what the are but for what else they are.”



The Challenges of Photographing in Natural Light

© Judy Host 2013 | Lens: APO 70-200mm F2.8mm EX DG OS HSM | Aperture: F 7.1 | Shutter speed: 1/200sec |  ISO 800 | Exposure mode: Manual mode | Focal length: 157mm

The challenges of photographing in natural light can be many. I don’t always get to choose when I photograph, especially because I photograph children and sometimes the best time for them is in the middle of the day. When that happens there are a few things that can help to make this actually work pretty well.