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Tag: Wide Angle Lens
03.28.2014

High Concept Photography

An example of a high concept image, this depiction of McClures Beach at Point Reyes National Seashore rises above the literal, conveying ethereal mood through a dream-like representation of sunset. Nikon D2X. Sigma 10-20mm f/4-5.6 EX DC HSM lens. f/16, .5 second. ISO 100. Sigma Circular DG Polarizer Filter. Gitzo GT2451EX tripod with Gitzo ball head. Photo © David FitzSimmons. All rights reserved.

In “The High Concept Image,” a recent feature in Outdoor Photographer, nature photographer Ian Plant intelligently challenges photographers to capture creative, thoughtful images that move beyond “snapshots,” rising to the level of “art.”

Ian’s description of the high concept image is in contradistinction to the “low-concept image,” which he points out is generally more “documentary” or “literal” in nature. Seeing nothing wrong with such grab shots, he does, however, push photographers to look for new ways to depict the world. He invokes legendary photographer Minor White, who once said “One should photograph objects not only for what the are but for what else they are.”

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11.07.2013

Vivid Vizcaya

The exquisitely appointed Vizcaya Museum and Gardens is a photographer’s paradise. The former home of businessman James Deering, who made his fortune manufacturing agricultural machinery, is filled with architecture begging for megapixels of detail, super wide angle views, and impeccable HDR techniques.

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10.22.2013

“Go Wide”- Utilizing Extreme Wide Angle Lenses for Impact

© 2013 Lindsay Adler | Lens: Sigma 12-24mm| Camera: Canon 5D Mark II | Focal Length: 21 | Shutter speed: 1/100 sec | Aperture: f/5.6 | ISO: 400

One way to create eye-catching imagery is to break the rules. When you shatter these rules, you stop people in their tracks! One of the first rules of portrait and fashion photography I learned was to NOT use a wide angle lens when photographing people. I was told this would distort their features and be unflattering to the model. But what if you use the wide angle on purpose to distort and exaggerate a scene? Then it creates visual interest and impact. Now your images stand out and become memorable.

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09.04.2013

Making the Best of Opportunities in Nature Photography

As photographers, we often strive for that “perfect” image. Those who are most proficient in their art, in one way or another, pre-visualize the final photograph and strive to exercise the most possible control over all the variables involved in achieving the desired end result. The reality is that outside of the studio and particularly true in nature photography, all bets are off. The extensive planning and meticulous research performed prior to photographing a never before visited location may prove useful or lead to a near-fruitless and frustrating trip. The landscape artist cannot control light and precipitation and is always at the mercy of Mother Nature. Sometimes you have to come to terms with the fact that the iconic shot you saw in someone else’s portfolio will probably not be in yours. This is where you have the chance to prove your worth as a photographer by using your imagination and compositional skills to improvise and make the most out of the presented opportunities.

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08.08.2013

Fan Photo of the Week: Frank Lee’s Sunrise

About the Photograph

On the day this picture was taken, I woke up during the wee hours of the morning, and ventured into the darkness with my backpack stuffed full of photo equipment. I hiked from Hammock Beach (FL) to somewhere beyond the Washington Oaks Gardens State Park, and took pictures along the way. This stretch of beach in Palm Coast, Florida, is covered with Coquina rock formations and tide pools. It is an absolutely wonderful place for photography and exploration. When the sun started to rise, I setup and took a few long exposure shots using my Sigma 10-20mm F3.5 EX DC HSM lens and a variable ND variable filter. It was such a beautiful sunrise that I decided to do a self portrait using a wireless remote shutter release.

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03.28.2013

Fan Photo of the Week: Liam Doran’s Aspen Glades Rock Jump

Photo by Liam Doran. The Sigma 10-20 accentuates this image by making the skier look like he is much higher off the ground than he is and gives the viewer a great sense of place as it shows the aspens both vertically and horizontally.

This week’s Fan Photo of the Week was made by Liam Doran with the Sigma 10-20mm F3.5 EX DG HSM lens

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08.14.2012

Fan Photo of the Week: Karan Kauchhur’s Perfect Storm

© 2012 Karan Kaucchur

This week’s Fan photo of the week was taken by Karan Kauchhur using Sigma’s 10-20mm F4-5.6 DC HSM. I shot […]

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07.02.2012

Fireworks and Bright Lights in the Night for the Fourth of July and Beyond by Jack Howard

The fundamentals of making great fireworks photos remain the same today as back in the film days when I made this shot on Dec 31, 1999 with my trusty Sigma 17-35 F2.8-4.0 Ultrawide zoom on a Canon EOS A2 loaded with Kodak Vericolor ISO 100 film. I had originally set myself up on the boardwalk above the sand, but as more and more people showed up, there was serious bounce in the boards, so I moved to the sand instead. Looking at the stillness of the silhouetted people in the frame, you can tell these were a lot of rockets launched at the same time, with a relatively short (1-2 second) exposure.

The fourth of July means many things, and for photographers, one of the most exciting and challenging aspects of this holiday is capturing amazing photos of fireworks. The bright lights in the night paint the sky with multi-colored flames in a way that can be spectacular to witness and capture with your camera. And while it may seem that fireworks–and articles about how to capture fireworks with your DSLR–only appear for a few nights in early July, there are actually tons of nights from coast to coast all summer long when the skies are illuminated with fireworks.

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06.05.2012

Jason DeCaires Taylor Launches The Phoenix

In the waters off of Cancun, Mexico, Sigma sponsored eco-sculptor and photographer Jason deCaires Taylor is hard at work, creating […]

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06.01.2012

Beachscapes

Spots where sand, sea, and sky come together offer certain challenges to photographers, but the results can be so amazingly rewarding. Conditions can change quickly as the sun hides behind a cloud, and conditions most certainly change slowly as the tides sink and rise and the sun and moon dance across the sky. The same patch of sea may be mirror calm and reflecting golden light, or it may be a churn of furious waves. Fogs, mists, and wind-whipped sand can make for gorgeous images even as they fool camera meters. There’s a world of possibilities waiting to be captured along these edges, whenever you visit, and with whatever Sigma lens you’ve got in your bag.

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