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Tag: Wide Angle Lens

Sigma 24mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art: First Look

Along the Brooklyn waterfront. 30 second exposure at F11 at ISO 100 on the Canon 6D by Patrick Santucci.

Patrick Santucci and I had a few days to check out the first sample of the new 24mm F1.4 DG […]



A Night at the Very Large Array

Image copyright Roman Kurywczak Canon 1D Mark 3 body with the Sigma 12-24mm f/4.5-5.6 at 12mm for 30 seconds at f/5 and ISO 6400 mounted on Induro CT 304 tripod with BHL3 head.  Painted with flashlight for approximately 15 seconds.

As a Sigma Pro team member I had the privilege of being invited to give lectures and workshops at the 2014 Festival of Cranes out at the Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge. I have visited the refuge many times before, and, while I was excited about being able to photograph the birds again, I was most excited about my two nighttime lectures and workshops at the Very Large Array (VLA). These giant radio telescopes would make a great foreground subject for a star filled sky. Nobody has been allowed on the property at night since 2009, so I was very excited about taking a group out to the location. Sigma Photo would sponsor the event, and I agreed with the organizers of the festival to take out 40 participants each night. With a group that size, I knew I wouldn’t get much of a chance to take pictures myself, but it would be a great learning opportunity for the class. The image at top is one of the few I was able to take during a break in the instruction.



LENS EXPLORATION: Sigma 10-20mm F4-5.6 EX DC HSM


The Sigma 10-20mm F4-5.6 EX DC HSM zoom is the ideal ultra-wide lens. Sharp, compact, lightweight, able to take front-mounted filters, and, affordable, it’s the super-wide zoom for all types of photographers.

Landscape photographers day-in and day-out want to include as much of their scenic views as possible. The Sigma 10-20mm allows photographers to take in the grand vistas in open country, as well as much of much of what’s deep inside canyons and caves. Shooters focusing on architecture will find that the 10-w0mm’s extra-wide reach, equivalent to 15mm on a full-frame camera, takes in lots of real estate, whether indoor spaces or exterior views. Sports fans can drop this diminutive lens in their bags, allowing pulled-back images depicting field, fans, and sky. And macro enthusiasts will find joy in exploring all kinds of creative close-up work with this super-wide glass focusing on subjects less than five inches from the lens front!



Somewhat Secret Superpowers of Camera lenses

Everyone knows supertelephoto zoom lenses are great for long-reach photography at widest, like wild birds. Here, the Sigma 150-500mm is trained on an American Anhinga, at 500mm, wide open at F6.3.

The greatest thing about interchangeable camera lenses is the variety of optical designs, from ultrawide to supertelephoto and everything in between, that offer an incredible amount of variety for visual expression, creativity, and optical performance optimized for different photographic situations. And while it may be sometimes completely and totally obvious what types of photography a certain lens excels at—for example, everyone knows that Macros are designed to capture close-up details; telephoto lenses are great for long-reach wildlife and sports from the sidelines—many styles of camera lenses have lesser-known secret superpowers that can be called upon to make a photo. Let’s take a look!



Photographing the Nighttime Landscape with Sigma’s 12-24mm lens

I have been photographing nighttime landscapes for about 20 years now capturing images of star trails like the one pictured […]



High Concept Photography

An example of a high concept image, this depiction of McClures Beach at Point Reyes National Seashore rises above the literal, conveying ethereal mood through a dream-like representation of sunset. Nikon D2X. Sigma 10-20mm f/4-5.6 EX DC HSM lens. f/16, .5 second. ISO 100. Sigma Circular DG Polarizer Filter. Gitzo GT2451EX tripod with Gitzo ball head. Photo © David FitzSimmons. All rights reserved.

In “The High Concept Image,” a recent feature in Outdoor Photographer, nature photographer Ian Plant intelligently challenges photographers to capture creative, thoughtful images that move beyond “snapshots,” rising to the level of “art.”

Ian’s description of the high concept image is in contradistinction to the “low-concept image,” which he points out is generally more “documentary” or “literal” in nature. Seeing nothing wrong with such grab shots, he does, however, push photographers to look for new ways to depict the world. He invokes legendary photographer Minor White, who once said “One should photograph objects not only for what the are but for what else they are.”



Vivid Vizcaya

The exquisitely appointed Vizcaya Museum and Gardens is a photographer’s paradise. The former home of businessman James Deering, who made his fortune manufacturing agricultural machinery, is filled with architecture begging for megapixels of detail, super wide angle views, and impeccable HDR techniques.



Making the Best of Opportunities in Nature Photography

As photographers, we often strive for that “perfect” image. Those who are most proficient in their art, in one way or another, pre-visualize the final photograph and strive to exercise the most possible control over all the variables involved in achieving the desired end result. The reality is that outside of the studio and particularly true in nature photography, all bets are off. The extensive planning and meticulous research performed prior to photographing a never before visited location may prove useful or lead to a near-fruitless and frustrating trip. The landscape artist cannot control light and precipitation and is always at the mercy of Mother Nature. Sometimes you have to come to terms with the fact that the iconic shot you saw in someone else’s portfolio will probably not be in yours. This is where you have the chance to prove your worth as a photographer by using your imagination and compositional skills to improvise and make the most out of the presented opportunities.



Fan Photo of the Week: Frank Lee’s Sunrise

About the Photograph

On the day this picture was taken, I woke up during the wee hours of the morning, and ventured into the darkness with my backpack stuffed full of photo equipment. I hiked from Hammock Beach (FL) to somewhere beyond the Washington Oaks Gardens State Park, and took pictures along the way. This stretch of beach in Palm Coast, Florida, is covered with Coquina rock formations and tide pools. It is an absolutely wonderful place for photography and exploration. When the sun started to rise, I setup and took a few long exposure shots using my Sigma 10-20mm F3.5 EX DC HSM lens and a variable ND variable filter. It was such a beautiful sunrise that I decided to do a self portrait using a wireless remote shutter release.



Fan Photo of the Week: Liam Doran’s Aspen Glades Rock Jump

Photo by Liam Doran. The Sigma 10-20 accentuates this image by making the skier look like he is much higher off the ground than he is and gives the viewer a great sense of place as it shows the aspens both vertically and horizontally.

This week’s Fan Photo of the Week was made by Liam Doran with the Sigma 10-20mm F3.5 EX DG HSM lens