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Tag: Tips & Tricks

How to Photograph Your Dog: 7 – A Matter of Perspective

With deep snow covering the hills here in Ohio, I couldn’t resist taking Rowan out for a romp in the white and fluffy. Grabbing a rope toy for Rowan to retrieve, we headed out to a nearby field.

My goal was to take action photos, high speed images of Rowan racing through the snow. Rowan’s ‘fox red’ coat looks especially good in early- or late-day sun, so, I took her out to a hilltop where the last golden rays were lighting things up. Generally speaking, dog action shots require shutter speeds of at least, say, 1/1000 second. That means that strong sun, medium to wide apertures, and medium to high ISO settings are often best.



Why Circular Polarizers Still Matter


Why circular polarizers still matter: A high quality circular polarizer is still one of the most important accessories for any photographer’s bag. And the new Sigma Weather-resistant Circular Polarizers offer incredible performance, weather-tough design, and a fantastically upgraded case with grip arcs that keep the filters from rattling around in the bag.



How to get Published in Outdoor Sports Magazines

Ski photographer Liam Doran offers tips for breaking into adventure sports photography for the biggest magazines.



Taking Creative Control: Understanding Aperture and F/Stops

These two apples were photographed with the Sigma 18-35mm F1.8 DC HSM | A lens zoomed to 35mm with an F2.8 aperture for shallow depth of field. Notice how just a sliver of the leaf and near apple is on the focal plane. The front apple is about a foot from the lens, with the farther apple nine inches behind. The back wall with the very soft shadow is ten feet from the camera.  1/40 F2.8 ISO 400, continuous lighting.

Of the three main variables relating to creative and artistic control on DSLR and compact interchangeable cameras–aperture, shutter speed and ISO– aperture control, is for many beginners, the most difficult to grasp. Have no fear, we’re here to help. Learning how and when to select a wide or narrow aperture unleashes the creative and expressive potential of your camera’s lenses.



New York Whale Watching with the Sigma 150-500mm

© 2014 Mike Busch

New York Whale Watching with the Sigma 150-500mm F5-6.3 lens. Top tips for capturing great photos of humpback whales off New York City.



Somewhat Secret Superpowers of Camera lenses

Everyone knows supertelephoto zoom lenses are great for long-reach photography at widest, like wild birds. Here, the Sigma 150-500mm is trained on an American Anhinga, at 500mm, wide open at F6.3.

The greatest thing about interchangeable camera lenses is the variety of optical designs, from ultrawide to supertelephoto and everything in between, that offer an incredible amount of variety for visual expression, creativity, and optical performance optimized for different photographic situations. And while it may be sometimes completely and totally obvious what types of photography a certain lens excels at—for example, everyone knows that Macros are designed to capture close-up details; telephoto lenses are great for long-reach wildlife and sports from the sidelines—many styles of camera lenses have lesser-known secret superpowers that can be called upon to make a photo. Let’s take a look!



Photographing the Nighttime Landscape with Sigma’s 12-24mm lens

I have been photographing nighttime landscapes for about 20 years now capturing images of star trails like the one pictured […]



Single-shot Autofocus, or Continuous Autofocus, Or…

Learning how and when to use different settings and options for image capture is one of the most important parts of becoming a stronger photographer. There’s no setting or camera function that’s going to be perfect for all situations, while is exactly why there are so many options. For example, every DSLR offers a couple variations on Autofocus for either a Single-shot or Continuously tracking autofocus.

Each has it strengths and purposes, and even with that, there’s still times when switching the lens to manual focus is the best way to ensure that your chosen subject and focal point is sharp in the image. In this piece, we’re going to look at three photos of seagulls to briefly explore and explain the reasons why to choose one type of AF or manual focus over the others.



Experimenting with Polarizer Filters

A polarizer filter helped bring out the blue sky in this shot taken during the Sigma FitzSimmons Photography Island Adventure photo workshop on Kelleys Island, Ohio. By turning my polarizer, I was able to bring out the blue skies over Lake Erie. Sigma SD1 Merrill. Sigma 10-20mm F4-5.6 EX DC HSM lens set at 18mm. f/11, 1/15 sec. ISO 100. Sigma 77mm Circular DG Polarizer Filter. Gitzo GT2451EX tripod with Gitzo ball head. Processed in Sigma Photo Pro 5.5, optimized in Adobe Photoshop CS5, NIK Viveza plug-in applied. Photo © 2013 David FitzSimmons. All rights reserved.

It’s pretty well known that a polarizer filter may deepen the color of blue skies, but the more subtle effects of a polarizer are often less known–and certainly worth exploring.

Polarizers limit the light that penetrates through them. As such, they help reduce contrast. Polarizers are like prison bars, where the light bouncing up and down through the bars passes through, but the light waves traveling horizontally do not. Of course, polarizing filters can be rotated, changing which directional light reaches a camera’s sensor and which does no



Introducing No Fear Photography

Welcome to the newest section of our blog, No Fear Photography! We’re here to help photographers learn to make the most of their cameras, to take creative control, to explore, and capture amazing images all along the way.