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Tag: Sigma 85mm F1.4 EX DG HSM

Boudoir Photography Session 3: Posing Flow

Jen Rozenbaum

In the third episode, Sigma Pro Jen Rozenbaum offers advice on creating poses that transition seamlessly without wasting time and shooting […]




© 2015 Kevin Ames

What’s bright, gives wonderful, round bokeh and is perfect for portraits, sports, street and product photography? Give up?

It’s Sigma’s 85mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM lens. This beauty fits on both full frame and cropped sensor cameras.

The ideal portrait focal length is said to be twice to two and a half times the normal focal length. So before diving into the 85 let’s take a look at focal length and what it means in regards to sensor size. First, here’s a definition or two.



How to utilize 5 lenses for a boudoir shoot

The area around the bed is very tight in my studio so I almost always use the 50mm. It allows me to get full body shots and close up shots with ease.  © 2014 Jen Rozenbaum | Lens: 50mm | Aperture: F3.5 | Shutter speed: 1/125 sec

There is one question that is asked of me most often when I am teaching photography. That question is “Which lens is your favorite”? That’s such a terribly difficult question for me to answer. Lenses are like children, I love them all and hate to play favorites.

All kidding aside, I carry 5 lenses with me everywhere I go. Sigma’s 35mm F1.4, 50mm F1.4, 85mm F1.4, 24-70mm F2.8 and the 70-200mm F2.8. Most of my boudoir shoots are done in studio. My studio is very small (about 10’x10’) so I most often shoot with my 50mm due to size constraints. What if I want to take my client out to the rooftop though? (I’m bringing out the 70-200mm for that!) or into the vestibule (only the 24-70mm will do there). I would be unprepared without the other lenses.



Photographing in Manual Mode to create Beautiful Exposures

©Judy Host 2014 | Lens: 70-200mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM | Aperture: F 7.1 | Shutter speed: 1/320sec | ISO 320 | Focal length 80mm| Exposure: manual mode | Processed in Photoshop using Perfectly Clear by Authentic to add a bright and more saturated look.

Learning to use manual settings in your camera will provide you with the ability to create the beautiful exposures you desire. The exposure in your camera is determined by several different settings. Exposure refers to the lightness or darkness of the image. The settings are: 1) the aperture, the lens opening, which lets in light and controls the depth of field; 2) the shutter speed, the speed by which the lens lets in light, and 3) the ISO, which controls the camera’s sensitivity to light. The right combination of these three settings will give you a nearly perfect exposure and give you the effect you want for your image.



Prime Time: Focus on Fixed Focal Length Lenses

A ring of beach rocks seen through the Sigma 15mm EX DG HSM Diagonal Fisheye with the horizon line near the center of the frame.

Prime lenses are designed for exceptional imaging at a single focal length. Unlike zoom lenses that easily span a given focal range and variable field of view with a twist of the zoom ring, the field of view and focal length remains constant. If you want to take in less of the surroundings with a given prime lens, you’ve got to physically move closer, and to take in more of the scene, you’ve got to back up. But of course, as you move, the angle of view remains the same all the while.



The DFW Expo and the Holiday Season in Full Swing

The holiday season is upon us.  In Arlington, Texas the beginning of the holiday season is marked in the photography […]



Exercise your Creativity with Prime Lenses

© 2013 Kevin Ames | Lens: 85mm F1.4 DG HSM | Shutter speed: 1/125 sec | Aperture: F11 | ISO: 100

More and more I find my self shooting one of three Sigma prime focal length lenses in the studio… the 50mm f/1.4, the 85mm f/1.4 and the 150mm f/2.8 OS macro. I noticed that zooms were making me a bit lazy. Hey! It’s a lot easier to twist a zoom ring that it is to move a 300 pound studio stand even if it is on wheels. So why do I do it? A couple of reasons. Perspective, perspective, perspective. I shoot full frame Canon cameras. Their normal focal length is almost 50mm. That’s about the same angle of view as we see with our eyes. I use the 50 mainly for full length photographs.



Shot with Sigma: Trash the Dress Behind the Scenes video

Justin Wojtczak of created this very cool behind the scenes and how-to video of a trash-the-dress session exclusively with Sigma lenses. All the still shots, as well as all the HDSLR footage of Justin and crew in action were captured with Sigma glass including the 70-200mm F2.8, the 20mm F1.8, and the 85m, 50mm and 30mm F1.4 primes. If the name sounds familiar, it’s because Justin was recently the winner of the FStoppers Behind the Scenes contest!



The Sigma 85mm F1.4 EX DG HSM is World Class Glass

Since its announcement last year, the Sigma 85mm F1.4 EX DG HSM has been generating tons of buzz in photography […]



Sigma SD1: On Location with Robert Lopshire

by Jack Howard A while back, I had an idea for a blog posting involving models, the Sigma SD1, social […]