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Tag: Roman Kurywczak

The Magic of Iceland – with just four Sigma lenses

©2015 Roman Kurywczak | Canon 1Dx body with the Sigma 24mm F1.4 DG HSM Art, f/16 for 25 sec. at ISO 100 all mounted on Induro CT304 tripod and BHL3 head.  Vü Sion circular polarizer and a 10 stop solid neutral density filter.

Many people often ask me how I travel to my Roamin’ with Roman Photo Tours workshop locations with my camera […]



Sigma Telephoto Lens Throwdown: Part II

Canon 1D Mark 3 with the Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport at 512mm @f/7.1for 1/2000 sec. and ISO 1250 hand held moving boat

In part 1 of my throwdown blog, I compared the Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM C lens versus the […]



Sigma Telephoto Lens Throwdown: Part I


People often approach me at lectures and tradeshows asking me about the performance and sharpness of Sigma lenses.  I have […]



Are Teleconverters Still Relevant in Today’s Photography?

©2015 Roman Kurywczak | Lens: Sigma 120-300 f/2.8 DG OS HSM Sport with the new Sigma TC-2001 2x teleconverter | Camera: Canon 1D Mark 3 body |Focal length: 600mm | Aperture: f/7.1 | Shutter speed: 1/2500 sec. | ISO 800 with Center Weighted Average Metering

In part 1 of the relevance of teleconverters, I discussed the using the new Sigma TC-1401 1.4x teleconverter out in Bosque Del Apache NWR with the new Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Sports. In this post, I will cover using the new Sigma TC-2001 2x Teleconverter. All images were photographed hand held.



First Impressions: Sigma 150-600mm f/5 – 6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary

I finally got a chance to get my hands on the Sigma 150-600mm f/5 – 6.3 DG OS HSM | Contemporary while I was down in Ft. Myers for the Florida Camera Club Councils annual conference. I had a ½ day free before and after the conference and I was eager to get out and put the lens through its paces and compare its performance against the Sigma 150-600mm f/5 – 6.3 DG OS HSM | Sport version.



Are Teleconverters Still Relevant in Today’s Photography?

I had the opportunity to return to Bosque del Apache NWR a few weeks ago to lead a workshop that was sponsored by Sigma Photo, the Friends of Bosque, and Hunt’s Photo and Video. This was going to be an intensive hands-on flight photography workshop and I was bringing with me the new Sigma 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport as well as the Sigma 120-300mm F2.8 DG OS HSM Sport. Why those lenses and not my beloved Sigmonster? Don’t worry, I don’t leave home without that lens but I was especially excited about testing the two shorter telephoto lenses with the brand new Sigma 1.4 and 2x teleconverters (TC).



A Night at the Very Large Array

Image copyright Roman Kurywczak Canon 1D Mark 3 body with the Sigma 12-24mm f/4.5-5.6 at 12mm for 30 seconds at f/5 and ISO 6400 mounted on Induro CT 304 tripod with BHL3 head.  Painted with flashlight for approximately 15 seconds.

As a Sigma Pro team member I had the privilege of being invited to give lectures and workshops at the 2014 Festival of Cranes out at the Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge. I have visited the refuge many times before, and, while I was excited about being able to photograph the birds again, I was most excited about my two nighttime lectures and workshops at the Very Large Array (VLA). These giant radio telescopes would make a great foreground subject for a star filled sky. Nobody has been allowed on the property at night since 2009, so I was very excited about taking a group out to the location. Sigma Photo would sponsor the event, and I agreed with the organizers of the festival to take out 40 participants each night. With a group that size, I knew I wouldn’t get much of a chance to take pictures myself, but it would be a great learning opportunity for the class. The image at top is one of the few I was able to take during a break in the instruction.



Festival of Cranes: Sigma 150-600mm F5-6.3 Sport

I was fortunate enough to get a chance to test out the new Sigma 150-600mm f5-6.3 Sport lens at the Festival of Cranes out in New Mexico. The images above and below are some of the first I captured with it early one morning at the Bosque del Apache NWR. What is unusual about the images is that I normally use a Canon 1D Mark 3 body, but as fate would have it, the Canon mount Sigma 150-600mm f5-6.3 Sport lens got lost on its way to the festival. What to do? Sigma tech rep and photographer Brett Wells came to my rescue and offered me his Nikon version of the Sigma 150-600mm f5-6.3 Sport lens along with his Nikon D600 body. So while it was a bit uncomfortable for me working with a camera body that I wasn’t familiar with, I had no problem putting the lens through its paces. After all, Sigma makes most of their lenses in Canon, Nikon, Sony, Pentax, and Sigma mounts. As I returned to the festival tent I had a surprise awaiting me as the case with the Canon mount Sigma 150-600mm Sport had just came in and was at our booth. I could now use that lens for the next few days in combination with my Canon 1D Mark 3 body.



The Power of the Sigma EM-140 DG Macro Flash for Macro Photography

© 2014 Roman Kurywczak | Sigma 150mm f/2.8 macro lens | Aperture: f/22 | Shutter speed: 1/200 sec. | ISO 500 with the Sigma EM-140 DG Macro Flash at -1

OK, it is no secret that I have used some sort of flash in almost every macro photography image I have ever taken. Why? I love maximum depth of field and while I love natural light photography, the 3 days of the year it is calm enough to photograph outside just weren’t enough! All kidding aside, most “natural light” macro photography with maximum depth of field is done inside where everything is controlled and you have to be on a tripod. I am guilty of resorting to this technique often myself but I do love being out in the field. The wind is generally too strong on most day and many locations do not allow you to bring a tripod. That is why I embraced the power of flash. I have used many varieties of flash for my macro work including a Speedlights, twin lights, and old ring lights so I jumped at the chance to try out my Sigma EM-140 DG Macro Flash to see how it stacked up to those flashes. The image at top is one of the first I took and you can see just how close to the flower I got and the macro flash illuminated the bloom very nicely at that close range.



Are filters still relevant in today’s landscape photography? Part 2

©2014 Roman Kurywczak | Lens: Sigma 12-24mm | Focal Length: 21mm | Aperture: f/20 | Shutter speed: 1.0 sec. | ISO 400 on tripod.  3 stop Singh Ray reverse GND filter and 3 stop GND filter stacked.

In part one we discussed the use of polarizers and solid neutral density filters. So what other filter should you have in your bag? The answer is: the graduated split neutral density (ND) filter. What do they do? They allow you to balance the light on the foreground with the tonality and brightness of the sky. How? The filter is split in half with the top being much darker and the bottom half clear. The dark area is graduated down towards the middle, which allows you to darken the sky and better match it up with the tonality of the foreground.

They generally come in 2 styles; one with a hard edge and the other is often referred to a soft edge. The hard edge has a clearly defined line where the soft edge is more graduated. This is the one I prefer and use most of the time. A variety I also have is called a reverse graduated neutral density filter (both made by Singh Ray) where the darkest area is towards the middle which makes it particularly useful as the sun comes up or is about to set. It is best suited for situations where you have a pretty level horizon without many protrusions into the sky. Below is an example of both and they typically come in increments from 1stop all the way up to 5 or more. Most practical are the 2 and 3 stop versions from numerous manufacturers. Notice that I am not recommending any screw in type as what you want to darken is seldom in the middle of the frame.