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Tag: Roman Kurywczak
11.04.2014

The Power of the Sigma EM-140 DG Macro Flash for Macro Photography

© 2014 Roman Kurywczak | Sigma 150mm f/2.8 macro lens | Aperture: f/22 | Shutter speed: 1/200 sec. | ISO 500 with the Sigma EM-140 DG Macro Flash at -1

OK, it is no secret that I have used some sort of flash in almost every macro photography image I […]

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10.07.2014

Are filters still relevant in today’s landscape photography? Part 2

©2014 Roman Kurywczak | Lens: Sigma 12-24mm | Focal Length: 21mm | Aperture: f/20 | Shutter speed: 1.0 sec. | ISO 400 on tripod.  3 stop Singh Ray reverse GND filter and 3 stop GND filter stacked.

In part one we discussed the use of polarizers and solid neutral density filters.  So what other filter should you […]

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10.06.2014

Are filters still relevant in today’s landscape photography? Part 1

This simple answer is absolutely yes!!!  While they may not be as important as they were in the film days, […]

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05.19.2014

Photographing the Nighttime Landscape with Sigma’s 12-24mm lens

I have been photographing nighttime landscapes for about 20 years now capturing images of star trails like the one pictured […]

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04.01.2014

Macro Photography: Don’t like the background? Bring your own!

© 2014 Roman Kurywczak | Lens: Sigma 180mm f/3.5 EX DG HSM APO macro | Aperture: f/32 | Shutter speed: 1.6 sec | ISO 800 tripod with multiple reflectors

In my last post, I left you with an image of a flower from my own garden that I was desperately trying to photograph against the beautiful spring sky. I was lying on the ground trying for a good angle when Darrell Gulin’s lesson came to mind. Why struggle out in the field? He often photographs butterflies in his own kitchen and uses printed natural looking backgrounds behind his subjects. Why was I crawling in the grass, struggling to get a good angle? It was my flower so I simply clipped it and brought it inside. I went back outside and took a picture of the beautiful sky. Back inside, I printed it on some cheap 13×19 matte paper, mounted it on some stiff backboard, placed it behind the bloom, and voila! The image at top is very similar as I used a printed natural green background, but done outdoors. My question to you is; could you tell that it was a printed background? It was an actual “real sky” (in the last post) and some “real” foliage, in this image. Does it really matter? How is that different than the manipulation in the field with the bark or the snow? That is a choice for you to ultimately make but now, I could easily have any background I wanted behind the subject and the sky literally was the limit! Below is my low-tech indoor setup that I can use, any day of the year, and have any background I want even if there is a foot of snow outside! Just remember to close the window too.

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03.05.2014

Macro Photography: Control the background

© 2014 Roman Kurywczak | Lens: Sigma 180mm f/3.5 EX DG HSM APO macro lens | Aperture: f/22 | Shutter speed: 1/300 sec | ISO 640 hand held with Canon MT 24EX twin flash at -1

Unlike other genres of photography, macro photography allows you the most control. I find that backgrounds are just as critical to the success of a macro image as the subject itself. My first tip on getting closer was for circumstances where you couldn’t control the background. My second tip is to show you that in most cases, you can control the background and it is relatively easy! The butterfly image above was taken in Butterfly World in Coconut Creek Florida. There are thousands of live butterflies in the aviary with a great variety but many times the backgrounds are less than appealing. What to do in that situation? I will walk though the aviary looking for a location with a nice background and ignore almost everything else going on! Once I find a bloom that is isolated from the background I will patiently wait for a butterfly to land on it and fire away. Using this technique in the field will always make for stronger compositions, as cluttered background will often distract from the beauty of the main subject.

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02.18.2014

Macro Photography Tips: Get Closer

© 2014 Roman Kurywczak | Sigma 180mm f/3.5 EX DG HSM APO macro lens, f/32 for 1/100 sec. and ISO 800 hand held with Canon MT 24EX twin flash at -3 and large flashlight to backlight Gerbera Daisy.

When photographing flowers, people often make the common mistake of trying to capture the entire flower even when there are distracting or unwanted elements in the frame. In many cases an arboretum or flower show do not allow tripods either…so what is the solution? The simple answer is to get closer! You don’t need to see the entire bloom and foliage to get your point across and macro lenses are especially well suited for this task. The image above of the Gerber Daisy is a great example of this philosophy.

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12.30.2013

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula with the Sigma 12-24mm lens

© 2013 Roman Kurywczak | Lens: Sigma 12-24mm | Focal length: 12mm | Aperture: f/22 | Shutter speed: 13 sec. on foreground and 1.6 sec. for the sky manually merged | ISO 100 on tripod

I had the opportunity to spend a few days in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.  I was doing some presentations in Kalamazoo […]

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12.18.2013

A Wildlife Photographer…attends the American Photo Model Shoot

I am a wildlife and nature photographer but I often like to step out of my comfort zone and photograph […]

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11.19.2013

Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Park: a nature photographer’s mecca.

©2013 Roman M. Kurywczak | Lens: Sigma 12-24mm | Focal length: 21mm | Aperture:  f/20 | Shutter speed: 1.0 sec | ISO 400 on tripod

Yellowstone National Park and Grand Teton National Park have to be the premier nature photography location in the lower 48 states. Subjects range from stunning and otherworldly landscapes to abundant free roaming wildlife. The best time to visit the parks is either in early spring (June) or my favorite time of year in late September to early October as the leaves start to change. The large summer crowds are gone and the park takes on a much slower pace, as it gets ready for the approaching winter. The image above is of the Teton Range just off the outside road. This image is at first light and I used a Singh-Ray, 3 stop, reverse graduated neutral density filter to help balance the foreground with the much lighter sky and mountain range.

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