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Tag: Robert O’Toole
02.20.2014

Sigma’s 105mm F2.8 Macro OS

© 2014 Robert O'Toole | Sigma 105mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM Macro, Nikon D800E, manual mode, 1/200th s at f/8, ISO 640, Single SB-R200 wireless flash at 1:8 power manual mode, handheld.

The Sigma 105mm F2.8 Macro EX DG OS HSM lens has become one of my favorite lenses for macro photography in the field. So what makes me reach for this lens when Sigma offers five macro lenses when I own all of them? The answer is balance- the 105mm lens is really good at everything and one of the best in terms image quality. This lens can give you the sharpest results possible with an excellent balance of size, weight, working distance at a very high value per dollar price.

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11.14.2013

Macro Flash Photography: Create Natural Looking Macro Images

©2013 Robert O'Toole | Exposure mode: Manual mode | Shutter speed: 1/200th sec | Aperture: f8 | ISO 200 |  flash @ 1/40 output level | Lens: Sigma 105mm f/2.8 OS macro lens

One of the most important rules for macro flash photography is balance. For natural looking macro images you have to balance the ambient light and flash output. When the flash and ambient light are balanced the use of flash will not even be apparent to the viewer.

The problem is that with flash output overpowering the natural light in background it will underexpose and go dark, in some cases like the image below, it can underexpose to the point that is appears black.

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10.10.2013

How to Control Extremely High Contrast Scenes

©2013 Robert O'Toole | Female crab spider on Cosmos. South Coast Botanical Gardens, RPV, California. Lens: Sigma 105mm f/2.8 OS macro lens | Nikon D800E | Shutter speed: 1/200 sec | Aperture:  f/8 | ISO 200. Monopod and Jobu tilt head. Nikon SB-R200 Wireless Speedlight in manual mode 1/5 power with diffuser.

Photographing in the field in contrasty harsh light is something every photographer has to deal with. This is a technique that I use for those difficult high contrast situations. For a more natural looking image you need to take control of the light to handle the light and dark tones in a high contrast image.

It is important to understand the problem with high contrast scenes. Exposing for the light tones will cause the darker tones to underexpose and exposing for the darks will result in blown out highlights.

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