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Tag: prime lenses

20mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art: Hands-On Sneak Peek with Image Samples


The Sigma 20mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art is the world’s first full-frame 20mm F1.4 ultra-wide angle lens. It is […]



Sigma Art Lenses for Razor Sharp Detail

A raindrop hangs from a leaf as seen through the Sigma 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art lens wide open at F1.4. 1/200 F1.4 ISO 400 on a Canon EOS 6D. The focal point is sharp and crisp, while the depth of field is ridiculously shallow.

Sigma Art lenses are renowned for razor-sharp detail on the focal plane, even at widest apertures.



How to Photograph Your Dog #12 – Fast Dog, Fast Prime

We loaded Rowan in the Suby and headed down to Pleasant Hill Lake, which was swelling higher and higher with spring rain. A lakeside campground had become partially inundated with water—a great place to let our pooch swim.

I dialed up my D800E to ISO 1600, which, in the late day sun, allowed me to shoot at f/8 at 1/2000 second. This gave me moderately strong depth-of-field and a shutter speed fast enough to stop Rowan running, splashing, and swimming as she retrieved sticks.




© 2015 Kevin Ames

What’s bright, gives wonderful, round bokeh and is perfect for portraits, sports, street and product photography? Give up?

It’s Sigma’s 85mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM lens. This beauty fits on both full frame and cropped sensor cameras.

The ideal portrait focal length is said to be twice to two and a half times the normal focal length. So before diving into the 85 let’s take a look at focal length and what it means in regards to sensor size. First, here’s a definition or two.



How to Photograph Your Dog: 2 – The ALMOST Perfect Picture

What I’m hearing from readers is this: In your dog blog, don’t tell us how to take professional pet portraits; […]



Sigma 50mm F1.4 EX DG HSM vs Sigma 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | A

Adding either of these Sigma 50mm F1.4s camera lenses to your kit is a great idea. Is the Sigma 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | A or 50mm F1.4 EC DG HSM right for you?



Great Camera Gear Ideas for the Summer Season from Sigma!

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Great gear ideas for the summer, from the team at Sigma. Ideas for cameras and lenses for wherever you’re heading this sunny season!



First Look: Sigma 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | A

Daffodils, captured wide open at F1.4 with the new Sigma 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | A lens on a classic 5D. 1/5000 F1.4 ISO 100.

The Sigma 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | A lens is simply amazing. This standard field of view, fast-aperture, full-frame, prime lens combines outstanding sharpness, fast autofocus, in a lens that is built with a singular vision on performance.



Photographing in Manual Mode to create Beautiful Exposures

©Judy Host 2014 | Lens: 70-200mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM | Aperture: F 7.1 | Shutter speed: 1/320sec | ISO 320 | Focal length 80mm| Exposure: manual mode | Processed in Photoshop using Perfectly Clear by Authentic to add a bright and more saturated look.

Learning to use manual settings in your camera will provide you with the ability to create the beautiful exposures you desire. The exposure in your camera is determined by several different settings. Exposure refers to the lightness or darkness of the image. The settings are: 1) the aperture, the lens opening, which lets in light and controls the depth of field; 2) the shutter speed, the speed by which the lens lets in light, and 3) the ISO, which controls the camera’s sensitivity to light. The right combination of these three settings will give you a nearly perfect exposure and give you the effect you want for your image.



Prime Time: Focus on Fixed Focal Length Lenses

A ring of beach rocks seen through the Sigma 15mm EX DG HSM Diagonal Fisheye with the horizon line near the center of the frame.

Prime lenses are designed for exceptional imaging at a single focal length. Unlike zoom lenses that easily span a given focal range and variable field of view with a twist of the zoom ring, the field of view and focal length remains constant. If you want to take in less of the surroundings with a given prime lens, you’ve got to physically move closer, and to take in more of the scene, you’ve got to back up. But of course, as you move, the angle of view remains the same all the while.