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Tag: macro
10.01.2013

Beauty Photography: 150mm F2.8 DG OS Macro lens

© 2013 Lindsay Adler | Lens: Sigma 150mm 2.8 lens | Camera: Canon 5D Mark II | ISO: 200 | Shutter Speed: 1/125 sec | Aperture: f/11 | Focal Length: 150mm

A macro lens isn’t just for nature photographers capturing the intricate beauty of a flower or the amazing detail of an insect. Furthermore, it isn’t just for product photographers photographing the detail of a delicious meal or details of a ring.

A macro lens is an incredible tool for any beauty photographer to have in their kit. As a portrait, fashion and beauty photographer, for any beauty shoot I am sure to have these lens readily available. A macro lens opens up entire new realms of possibility. I can capture and magnify incredible details that otherwise would have been unappreciated and create fascinating compositions utilizing my macro lens!

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09.10.2013

Macro Photography: How Sensor Format Affects Image Depth of Field

© 2013 Robert OToole Photography | Lens: Sigma Macro 150mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM |  Camera: NIKON D800E | ISO: 100 | Aperture: f8 | Shutter speed: 1/250 sec | single SB-R200 flash. This flower was framed in the viewfinder with a full frame sensor format body in FX (full frame) mode.

One of the biggest challenges with macro photography is working with a limited depth of field or DOF. When I am shooting macro I am always trying to make sure the subject and elements in the frame appear sharp by adjusting the aperture and making sure the important elements in image fall on the plane of focus by adjusting my angle of view. But there is another important element that has a huge effect on DOF that most people don’t even know about, how a different sensor format can and will effect the depth of field in your image. Moving to a smaller sensor format at the same apparent magnification will give you lots more DOF to work with in your macro images.

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08.14.2013

The Difference of One F-Stop

© 2013 David FitzSimmons | Wild Geranium F-Stop Study Animated GIF. The Botanic Garden at Smith College, Northampton, MA, USA. Sigma SD1 Merrill. Sigma 150mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM APO Macro. Sigma remote. Gitzo GT2541EX tripod and GH2780QR ball head.

In conjunction with Sigma and Hunt’s Photo, I recently lead a garden photography workshop at The Botanic Garden of Smith College in Northampton, MA. There and anywhere I lead a workshop dealing with macro photography, I always stress the importance of choosing your f-stops wisely.

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07.31.2013

Macro-licious and more…

© 2013 Kevin Ames

Macro lenses are for making pictures of bugs, watch parts, coins, jewelry and other tiny stuff. Right? Well not necessarily. Recently one of my model buddies wanted some beauty photographs that mimic Cover Girl makeup ads. We gathered one Friday morning at my studio and went to work. I set up an evenly lit white background using V-Flats while Hope had her makeup done by Kristen White.

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07.10.2013

Macro Photography: Working Distances with the Macro 105mm F2.8, 150mm F2.8 and 180mm F2.8

Sigma 180mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM APO Macro. Image copyright 2013 Robert OToole Photography

Judging by the number of questions I get from photographers concerning the working distances of macro lenses I think it is a good subject to talk about.

The working distance of a macro lens, not to be confused with minimum focus distance, is the distance between the front of your lens and the subject. This is different from the minimum focus distance which instead means the distance to the subject as measured from the focal plane mark on the camera body, not from the front of the lens. Working distance is a more important figure since it tells how much space you have between the front of your lens and your subject. Working distance generally increases with longer focal length lenses, shorter lenses usually have shorter working distances.

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