The Blog: See what
Sigma is saying.

Tag: Lindsay Adler
03.26.2014

The Dos and Don’ts of Posing Hands

© 2014 Lindsay Adler

Our job as portrait photographers is often to flatter our subjects and help them look their best. There are so many elements that can go into this equation; lighting, posing, expression, focal length, camera angle and more. There is a lot to consider, so sometimes it is useful to train our eyes to see certain undesirable visual elements so we can weed them out.

I have both a creative and analytical mind. I do not like absolutes. I do no like rules. I do, however, appreciate guidelines that help give us photographers a better understanding of how to use our art to communicate. I’d have to side with Pablo Picasso on this one; “’Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.’”

Read more >>

03.03.2014

All-in-One Wedding Solution: Sigma 24-105mm F4

This month I was invited by Sigma to test out their brand new Sigma 24-105mm F4 lens and to shoot a series of bridal images to demonstrate the versatility of the lens. I decided to put together a fashion-influenced bridal shoot in a stunning location and with the help of my incredible talented creative team. Once I had put together striking visual elements, I would then test all features of the lens that would be important to me as a working photographer.

For several years I photographed weddings, and all the challenges that come with them. I realized very quickly that the last thing I wanted to worry about was my gear. I had to focus on the posing, the lighting, keeping everyone happy, my extremely long shot-list, and much more. I needed to know my gear was reliable and would help me get those must-have moments. When I started I didn’t have a second shooter or assistant; I was the one-woman band expected to make every shot count.

Read more >>

02.05.2014

Photograph Anyone’s Good Side: Part 2

© 2013 Lindsay Adler

When your job is to flatter your portrait subjects, you need as many tools in your photographic toolbox as possible so you are prepared for any features, and any ‘flaws’.

I think it is important to mention that I am not judging people’s appearance. As a fashion photographer, I often get to photograph what society considers “ideal” forms of beauty. What I notice time and time again, however, is that certain models’ “flaws” are what make them unique and memorable. In fact, there are several supermodels with so-called flaws like gapped-teeth, unusual noses, and more.

What matters is not what society says is ‘perfect’ but instead how your subjects perceives themselves. You want them to feel confident, attractive and proud of the images you provide them. You want to help them reduce anything they are self-conscious about and help their expression glow in their images.

Read more >>

01.15.2014

Photograph Anyone’s Good Side: Part 1

© 2013 Lindsay Adler | @85mm

As photographers, our job is to be problem solvers. We need to come up with visual solutions to a wide range of ‘problems’. Advertising photographers help their clients to express their brand and allure the target audience with their images. Food photographers must light and style the food to make any viewer’s mouth water. Portrait photographers must use the tools available to them to flatter their subjects.

While I consider myself a fashion photographer, a great number of my biggest clients are actually portrait clients including athletes, musicians, and celebrities. Together with my creative team we are helping them to express their personal brand through the images we make. These people are often NOT models or model-esqe. They have ‘flaws’ just like the rest of us, and my job is to help emphasize their assets and reduce attention to ‘flaws’.

Read more >>

11.28.2013

Sigma Safari Photo Shoot: Promo Images

© 2013 Lindsay Adler | Camera: Sigma SD1 | Lens: 18-35mm F1.8 | Focal length: 26mm | Shutter speed: 1/125sec | ISO 100 | Aperture: f/11

The PhotoPlus Expo, held annually at the Jacob Javits Center in New York City, is one of the biggest photo […]

Read more >>

10.22.2013

“Go Wide”- Utilizing Extreme Wide Angle Lenses for Impact

© 2013 Lindsay Adler | Lens: Sigma 12-24mm| Camera: Canon 5D Mark II | Focal Length: 21 | Shutter speed: 1/100 sec | Aperture: f/5.6 | ISO: 400

One way to create eye-catching imagery is to break the rules. When you shatter these rules, you stop people in their tracks! One of the first rules of portrait and fashion photography I learned was to NOT use a wide angle lens when photographing people. I was told this would distort their features and be unflattering to the model. But what if you use the wide angle on purpose to distort and exaggerate a scene? Then it creates visual interest and impact. Now your images stand out and become memorable.

Read more >>

10.01.2013

Beauty Photography: 150mm F2.8 DG OS Macro lens

© 2013 Lindsay Adler | Lens: Sigma 150mm 2.8 lens | Camera: Canon 5D Mark II | ISO: 200 | Shutter Speed: 1/125 sec | Aperture: f/11 | Focal Length: 150mm

A macro lens isn’t just for nature photographers capturing the intricate beauty of a flower or the amazing detail of an insect. Furthermore, it isn’t just for product photographers photographing the detail of a delicious meal or details of a ring.

A macro lens is an incredible tool for any beauty photographer to have in their kit. As a portrait, fashion and beauty photographer, for any beauty shoot I am sure to have these lens readily available. A macro lens opens up entire new realms of possibility. I can capture and magnify incredible details that otherwise would have been unappreciated and create fascinating compositions utilizing my macro lens!

Read more >>

09.12.2013

Portrait Photography at Noon: How to Conquer Harsh, Direct Sunlight

© 2013 Lindsday Adler | Lens: Sigma 85mm 1.4 | Camera: Canon 5D Mark III | ISO: 100 | Aperture:  f/2.8 | Shutter speed:  1/1000sec

Shooting a portrait at high noon can be an intimidating thing for many of us. The light is harsh, contrasty and unflattering. Furthermore, the light in the scene creates unsightly overexposed highlights and deep underexposed shadows. The ‘dynamic range’ of this scene is too much to capture all of the tones in a single frame.

Of course, it’s easier to just avoid high noon for portraits, but sometimes the situation is unavoidable. Don’t worry! You don’t need to bring tons of flashes or studio strobes on location or any expensive equipment to save the shot!

Read more >>

09.05.2013

Be Smarter Than Your Camera: Backlight Photography

©2013 Lindsay Adler | Lens: Sigma 85mm 1.4 | Camera: Canon 5D Mark III | ISO: 800 | Aperture:  f/2.2 Shutter Speed: 1/500 sec

When our camera reads the light in a scene, its trying to give us an ‘average’ or middle grey exposure. […]

Read more >>

02.01.2013

Welcome to the New Sigma Website!

Welcome to the redesigned website of Sigma Corporation of America. Over the past several month, our team has been hard at work to redesign, refresh, upgrade, and refine the overall look, feel, and user experience on our website. Take a look around and you’ll see our focus is on ease of navigation, with a very image-forward design. Photography is our business–our only business, and that focuse shows in our redesign philosophy.

Read more >>