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Tag: Landscapes
06.30.2015

Sigma 10-20mm F3.5 EX DC HSM for Outdoor Action Photography

1/800 sec. f8.0 ISO 400 at 10mm on Canon 7D with off camera flash.  From top to bottom and foreground to background there is a lot for the eye to see in this image.  That is the beauty of a wide angle like the 10-20 f3.5 EX DC HSM to put an athlete in an environment.

Editor’s Note: A few years back, we first came to notice the outstanding work Liam Doran was creating with the […]

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12.08.2014

A Night at the Very Large Array

Image copyright Roman Kurywczak Canon 1D Mark 3 body with the Sigma 12-24mm f/4.5-5.6 at 12mm for 30 seconds at f/5 and ISO 6400 mounted on Induro CT 304 tripod with BHL3 head.  Painted with flashlight for approximately 15 seconds.

As a Sigma Pro team member I had the privilege of being invited to give lectures and workshops at the 2014 Festival of Cranes out at the Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge. I have visited the refuge many times before, and, while I was excited about being able to photograph the birds again, I was most excited about my two nighttime lectures and workshops at the Very Large Array (VLA). These giant radio telescopes would make a great foreground subject for a star filled sky. Nobody has been allowed on the property at night since 2009, so I was very excited about taking a group out to the location. Sigma Photo would sponsor the event, and I agreed with the organizers of the festival to take out 40 participants each night. With a group that size, I knew I wouldn’t get much of a chance to take pictures myself, but it would be a great learning opportunity for the class. The image at top is one of the few I was able to take during a break in the instruction.

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10.28.2014

LENS EXPLORATION: Sigma 10-20mm F4-5.6 EX DC HSM

Tout_LensExploration_10-20

The Sigma 10-20mm F4-5.6 EX DC HSM zoom is the ideal ultra-wide lens. Sharp, compact, lightweight, able to take front-mounted filters, and, affordable, it’s the super-wide zoom for all types of photographers.

Landscape photographers day-in and day-out want to include as much of their scenic views as possible. The Sigma 10-20mm allows photographers to take in the grand vistas in open country, as well as much of much of what’s deep inside canyons and caves. Shooters focusing on architecture will find that the 10-w0mm’s extra-wide reach, equivalent to 15mm on a full-frame camera, takes in lots of real estate, whether indoor spaces or exterior views. Sports fans can drop this diminutive lens in their bags, allowing pulled-back images depicting field, fans, and sky. And macro enthusiasts will find joy in exploring all kinds of creative close-up work with this super-wide glass focusing on subjects less than five inches from the lens front!

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10.07.2014

Are filters still relevant in today’s landscape photography? Part 2

©2014 Roman Kurywczak | Lens: Sigma 12-24mm | Focal Length: 21mm | Aperture: f/20 | Shutter speed: 1.0 sec. | ISO 400 on tripod.  3 stop Singh Ray reverse GND filter and 3 stop GND filter stacked.

In part one we discussed the use of polarizers and solid neutral density filters. So what other filter should you have in your bag? The answer is: the graduated split neutral density (ND) filter. What do they do? They allow you to balance the light on the foreground with the tonality and brightness of the sky. How? The filter is split in half with the top being much darker and the bottom half clear. The dark area is graduated down towards the middle, which allows you to darken the sky and better match it up with the tonality of the foreground.

They generally come in 2 styles; one with a hard edge and the other is often referred to a soft edge. The hard edge has a clearly defined line where the soft edge is more graduated. This is the one I prefer and use most of the time. A variety I also have is called a reverse graduated neutral density filter (both made by Singh Ray) where the darkest area is towards the middle which makes it particularly useful as the sun comes up or is about to set. It is best suited for situations where you have a pretty level horizon without many protrusions into the sky. Below is an example of both and they typically come in increments from 1stop all the way up to 5 or more. Most practical are the 2 and 3 stop versions from numerous manufacturers. Notice that I am not recommending any screw in type as what you want to darken is seldom in the middle of the frame.

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10.06.2014

Are filters still relevant in today’s landscape photography? Part 1

Lens: Sigma 12-24mm F4.5-5.6 DG HSM II | Canon 1D Mark 3 | Focal length: 24mm | Aperture: f/22 | Shutter speed: 0.8 seconds | ISO 100 | no filters | all mounted on tripod

This simple answer is absolutely yes!!!  While they may not be as important as they were in the film days, […]

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05.28.2014

First Look: Sigma 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | A

Daffodils, captured wide open at F1.4 with the new Sigma 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | A lens on a classic 5D. 1/5000 F1.4 ISO 100.

The Sigma 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | A lens is simply amazing. This standard field of view, fast-aperture, full-frame, prime lens combines outstanding sharpness, fast autofocus, in a lens that is built with a singular vision on performance.

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05.19.2014

Photographing the Nighttime Landscape with Sigma’s 12-24mm lens

I have been photographing nighttime landscapes for about 20 years now capturing images of star trails like the one pictured […]

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04.14.2014

Photographing the Untamed Coast of Hawaii

Waipio Morning

The magic of Hawaii, and the reason to keep returning time and time again, lies beyond the well-manicured resorts and pristine sandy beaches. The spirit of the land, or aina as the natives call it, is in the towering cliffs, lush rainforests, volcanic rock-strewn black sand beaches, deep canyons, lava-spouting volcanoes and tall mountains. Most visitors don’t see the incredible diversity Hawaii has to offer, but to those willing to explore, including dedicated photographers, it’s literally a paradise. I will show you only a small part of that incredible natural beauty here in two images of Big Island’s wild coast.

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03.28.2014

High Concept Photography

An example of a high concept image, this depiction of McClures Beach at Point Reyes National Seashore rises above the literal, conveying ethereal mood through a dream-like representation of sunset. Nikon D2X. Sigma 10-20mm f/4-5.6 EX DC HSM lens. f/16, .5 second. ISO 100. Sigma Circular DG Polarizer Filter. Gitzo GT2451EX tripod with Gitzo ball head. Photo © David FitzSimmons. All rights reserved.

In “The High Concept Image,” a recent feature in Outdoor Photographer, nature photographer Ian Plant intelligently challenges photographers to capture creative, thoughtful images that move beyond “snapshots,” rising to the level of “art.”

Ian’s description of the high concept image is in contradistinction to the “low-concept image,” which he points out is generally more “documentary” or “literal” in nature. Seeing nothing wrong with such grab shots, he does, however, push photographers to look for new ways to depict the world. He invokes legendary photographer Minor White, who once said “One should photograph objects not only for what the are but for what else they are.”

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03.03.2014

What is a Zoom Lens? And why and when to choose a Zoom Lens?

Sigma offers a great variety of zoom lenses. (Lenses are not shown to scale in this display.)

A zoom lens is a type of camera lens that is offers the photographer a useful range of different focal lengths in a single lens. This is in comparison to a prime lens, which only offers a single focal length. A zoom lens allows for quick and easy re-framing of a scene while staying in the same physical position. Sigma offers a line of over 20 zoom lenses for DSLR photographers, ranging from wide angle zoom lenses, supertelephoto zoom lenses, and high-zoom ratio all-in-one lenses for both full-frame (DG) and APS-C (DC) digital cameras.

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