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Tag: Landscapes
04.14.2014

Photographing the Untamed Coast of Hawaii

Waipio Morning

The magic of Hawaii, and the reason to keep returning time and time again, lies beyond the well-manicured resorts and pristine sandy beaches. The spirit of the land, or aina as the natives call it, is in the towering cliffs, lush rainforests, volcanic rock-strewn black sand beaches, deep canyons, lava-spouting volcanoes and tall mountains. Most visitors don’t see the incredible diversity Hawaii has to offer, but to those willing to explore, including dedicated photographers, it’s literally a paradise. I will show you only a small part of that incredible natural beauty here in two images of Big Island’s wild coast.

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03.28.2014

High Concept Photography

An example of a high concept image, this depiction of McClures Beach at Point Reyes National Seashore rises above the literal, conveying ethereal mood through a dream-like representation of sunset. Nikon D2X. Sigma 10-20mm f/4-5.6 EX DC HSM lens. f/16, .5 second. ISO 100. Sigma Circular DG Polarizer Filter. Gitzo GT2451EX tripod with Gitzo ball head. Photo © David FitzSimmons. All rights reserved.

In “The High Concept Image,” a recent feature in Outdoor Photographer, nature photographer Ian Plant intelligently challenges photographers to capture creative, thoughtful images that move beyond “snapshots,” rising to the level of “art.”

Ian’s description of the high concept image is in contradistinction to the “low-concept image,” which he points out is generally more “documentary” or “literal” in nature. Seeing nothing wrong with such grab shots, he does, however, push photographers to look for new ways to depict the world. He invokes legendary photographer Minor White, who once said “One should photograph objects not only for what the are but for what else they are.”

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03.03.2014

What is a Zoom Lens? And why and when to choose a Zoom Lens?

Sigma offers a great variety of zoom lenses. (Lenses are not shown to scale in this display.)

A zoom lens is a type of camera lens that is offers the photographer a useful range of different focal lengths in a single lens. This is in comparison to a prime lens, which only offers a single focal length. A zoom lens allows for quick and easy re-framing of a scene while staying in the same physical position. Sigma offers a line of over 20 zoom lenses for DSLR photographers, ranging from wide angle zoom lenses, supertelephoto zoom lenses, and high-zoom ratio all-in-one lenses for both full-frame (DG) and APS-C (DC) digital cameras.

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12.30.2013

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula with the Sigma 12-24mm lens

© 2013 Roman Kurywczak | Lens: Sigma 12-24mm | Focal length: 12mm | Aperture: f/22 | Shutter speed: 13 sec. on foreground and 1.6 sec. for the sky manually merged | ISO 100 on tripod

I had the opportunity to spend a few days in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.  I was doing some presentations in Kalamazoo […]

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12.06.2013

Fan Photo of the Week: Jay Graviano’s Bay Bridge

This week’s Fan Photo comes to us from Jay Graviano of Los Altos, California and was made with the Sigma 70-200mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM lens. His long exposure of the Bay Bridge and SF skyline is quite stunning!

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11.27.2013

Sigma Holiday Gift Guide 2013: Our Pros Top Picks

For this year’s gift guide, we asked our Sigma Pros to recommend some of their favorite gear. This crew of amazingly talented and hard-working photographers each focuses on a different specialty and has their own individual style, and they’ve all got their favorite Sigma gear. Check out these great reasons why our pros choose to use Sigma lenses and cameras.

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11.19.2013

Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Park: a nature photographer’s mecca.

©2013 Roman M. Kurywczak | Lens: Sigma 12-24mm | Focal length: 21mm | Aperture:  f/20 | Shutter speed: 1.0 sec | ISO 400 on tripod

Yellowstone National Park and Grand Teton National Park have to be the premier nature photography location in the lower 48 states. Subjects range from stunning and otherworldly landscapes to abundant free roaming wildlife. The best time to visit the parks is either in early spring (June) or my favorite time of year in late September to early October as the leaves start to change. The large summer crowds are gone and the park takes on a much slower pace, as it gets ready for the approaching winter. The image above is of the Teton Range just off the outside road. This image is at first light and I used a Singh-Ray, 3 stop, reverse graduated neutral density filter to help balance the foreground with the much lighter sky and mountain range.

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11.05.2013

Morning at the Reflection Lakes, Mount Rainier National Park

Stormy Monday

Late every summer, nature photographers flock to the Pacific Northwest with the hope of capturing the majestic beauty of Mount Rainier and its gorgeous subalpine meadows. After much obsessive planning and conversations with photographers around Washington State, I was able to make my first trip to the region this year. My biggest concern was whether I would arrive on time to catch the peak wildflower bloom. The area experienced a warm spring and summer, and thus the wildflowers emerged earlier than expected. But, as luck would have it, that shouldn’t have been my primary worry.

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10.29.2013

Single-shot Autofocus, or Continuous Autofocus, Or…

Learning how and when to use different settings and options for image capture is one of the most important parts of becoming a stronger photographer. There’s no setting or camera function that’s going to be perfect for all situations, while is exactly why there are so many options. For example, every DSLR offers a couple variations on Autofocus for either a Single-shot or Continuously tracking autofocus.

Each has it strengths and purposes, and even with that, there’s still times when switching the lens to manual focus is the best way to ensure that your chosen subject and focal point is sharp in the image. In this piece, we’re going to look at three photos of seagulls to briefly explore and explain the reasons why to choose one type of AF or manual focus over the others.

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10.18.2013

Fall Foliage with Sigma’s 15mm F2.8 Diagonal Fisheye Lens

This image was made in the early afternoon when the sun was still high in the sky. By standing under the leaves, I was able to use the sun to backlight them. I shot this image at f/2.8 to blur out the background, drawing attention to the branch in the foreground.Sigma 15mm f2.8 Fisheye, 1/2500 sec at f/2.8, ISO 250.

Fall is my favorite time of year to take photographs, and I always push myself to get out and make the most of the brief window of brilliant color. I have spent the last week chasing fall foliage in the Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania. This year, after taking the obvious shots of deep oranges and reds, I used my Sigma 15mm Fisheye lens to capture the forest from a different perspective.

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