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Tag: David Fitzsimmons

How to Photograph Your Dog #13 – Wide-Open Primes for Stunning Pet Portraits

Stopping down to f/2 still blurs the background nicely while providing a bit more depth-of-field. Here Rowans nose, eyes, and ears appear reasonably in focus. Nikon D800E, Sigma 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | A lens at f/2, 1/100 sec., ISO 100. Photo © 2015 David FitzSimmons. All rights reserved.

In my last photo dog blog, I demonstrated how Sigma’s newest prime, the 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM | Art lens, […]



How to Photograph Your Dog #12 – Fast Dog, Fast Prime

We loaded Rowan in the Suby and headed down to Pleasant Hill Lake, which was swelling higher and higher with spring rain. A lakeside campground had become partially inundated with water—a great place to let our pooch swim.

I dialed up my D800E to ISO 1600, which, in the late day sun, allowed me to shoot at f/8 at 1/2000 second. This gave me moderately strong depth-of-field and a shutter speed fast enough to stop Rowan running, splashing, and swimming as she retrieved sticks.



How to Photograph Your Dog #11 – Wiener Dogs

This week I point my camera toward a smaller breed. It’s one that’s popular with budget-minded pet owners. Today we’ll photograph wiener dogs, a German breed that dates back to at least 13th Century.

Initially I intended to photograph a neighbor’s wiener dog, but, the truth is, our family fell in love with these diminutive beauties, so we bought one. Or, more precisely, we bought a whole pack of them.

To begin my portrait project, I decided that I wanted to create some high key Curious Critters



How to Photograph Your Dog #10 – Symmetry and Asymmetry in Action

Winter in Ohio has been splendid this year…if, of course, you like cold weather and snow. Rowan, our fox red […]



How to Photograph Your Dog: 9 – Polarizers for Perfect Pet Portraits

After a brisk cross-country ski with our fox red Lab pup Rowan, I decided to take a few snowy mug […]



How to Photograph Your Dog: 7 – A Matter of Perspective

With deep snow covering the hills here in Ohio, I couldn’t resist taking Rowan out for a romp in the white and fluffy. Grabbing a rope toy for Rowan to retrieve, we headed out to a nearby field.

My goal was to take action photos, high speed images of Rowan racing through the snow. Rowan’s ‘fox red’ coat looks especially good in early- or late-day sun, so, I took her out to a hilltop where the last golden rays were lighting things up. Generally speaking, dog action shots require shutter speeds of at least, say, 1/1000 second. That means that strong sun, medium to wide apertures, and medium to high ISO settings are often best.



How to Photograph Your Dog: 7 – Exposure: Photographing Your Beau in the Snow

The temps here in Ohio have dropped to below freezing, and a beautiful blanket of snow covers the ground—the perfect […]



How to Photograph Your Dog: 6 – New Year’s Resolutions

At the end of each year, we commonly reflect on our past 12 months and look forward to the next […]



How to Photograph Your Dog: 5 – Collar Color Theory

Almost all dogs sport a collar of one sort or another. If you plan on taking a lot of photos of your dog, then it’s probably worthwhile pondering what collar will look best on your furry friend.

Below are images depicting Rowan, our four-month old ‘fox red’ Labrador retriever, wearing collars of different colors. For years we have been using nylon collars from Lupine Pet, the gold standard for style, durability, and customer support. (Once, one of our pups chewed a hole in the collar of another one of our dogs. Lupine replaced the collar no questions asked!)



How to Photograph Your Dog: 4 – First Bath

Labs love water, right? Throw a stick into a pond, and your retriever will dart into the water likety split. But giving her a bath may be an entirely different story. So for your puppy’s first cleaning, make sure to have your camera in-hand.

For Rowan, her first time in the tub wasn’t too bad. Of course, pouring the initial containers of water on her head elicited a natural drawing away, a great subject for a close-up shot.