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12.23.2014

Photography in winter can be a challenge. And when I say “winter”, I’m not talking of winter in the sense of majestic snowcapped peaks framed by freshly powdered pines with perfect golden light and fire-toned brushstroke clouds–I’m talking more of the winter of dirty refrozen slushpiles downtown three frigid days after a mid-January sleetstorm around 11:17 on a grey Tuesday morning when it seems there’s nothing magical left in the world worth getting out of warm car with a camera for.

A starling sits atop a weathervane, atop a three story building, captured through the Sigma 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG HSM OS | Sports paired with a Rebel T3i at 600mm, for an effective 960mm focal distance. Cropped to near square format for presentation.

A starling sits atop a weather vane, atop a three story building, captured through the Sigma 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG HSM OS | Sports paired with a Rebel T3i at 600mm, for an effective 960mm focal distance. Cropped to near square format for presentation.

Winter has its challenges, for sure, especially in the deciduous zones, where skeleton trees thrust bony fingers at the sky, and vistas and sweeping wild scenes are brushed widely with swaths of stingy browns and grays, instead of the festive pastels of spring, the lush greens of summer and the fall fireworks of foliage palette. But winter has it own charms and own rewards, and for photographers looking to challenge themselves and experiment, it can be a great time to get out and explore with a long lens, like the new 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG HSM OS | Sports lens.

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12.23.2014

How to Recognize Good Posing

Posing is hard. It’s even harder to pose a boudoir client since she is usually not wearing much. No clothes, no where to hide!  So how do you know a good pose when you see it? Let me show you some examples.

Posing: Arms

© 2014 Jen Rozenbaum | Lens: 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art | Shutter speed: 1/400 sec | Aperture: F2.8 | ISO: 200

© 2014 Jen Rozenbaum | Lens: 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art | Shutter speed: 1/400 sec | Aperture: F2.8 | ISO: 200

In this first shot, my client looks larger than she looks in real life. The goal of a good pose is to make a client look as good as she looks in real life, if  not better. Making her look larger than real life is a huge fail.

So how do we make her look more like she looks in person (if not better)? In this case, the first point I notice is that her arms are adding bulk to her body. Arms are a tricky part of the body to pose because of this. They can easily make a woman look large.

Since her arms are up we can also see a lot of her back. Again, it’s making her look larger than she really is so we need to rearrange the pose slightly to flatter her more.

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12.23.2014

Congratulations to our winners, Ced Garret, Alycia Chroszucha, Darren White, and Jonathan Woodson!

Winners

 

Do you have a favorite Sigma lens in your kit?

Share a selfie gear shot of you and your Sigma lenses and cameras using either the #MySigmaLens or #MySigmaCamera hashtag on Twitter, Instagram, or Google Plus and it can be featured right here in this blog feed. Get silly, or get seriously creative, but be sure to share a photo with those hashtags by January 31st, 2015!

At the end of January, we’ll pick four of the photos, and hook up the photographer with a brand new Sigma weather-resistant polarizer filter that matches the lens pictured!

 

 

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Click the jump below for full rules and eligibility.

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