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Category: Sigma Pro
11.14.2013

Macro Flash Photography: Create Natural Looking Macro Images

©2013 Robert O'Toole | Exposure mode: Manual mode | Shutter speed: 1/200th sec | Aperture: f8 | ISO 200 |  flash @ 1/40 output level | Lens: Sigma 105mm f/2.8 OS macro lens

One of the most important rules for macro flash photography is balance. For natural looking macro images you have to balance the ambient light and flash output. When the flash and ambient light are balanced the use of flash will not even be apparent to the viewer.

The problem is that with flash output overpowering the natural light in background it will underexpose and go dark, in some cases like the image below, it can underexpose to the point that is appears black.

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11.12.2013

Lighting Patterns with Sigma’s 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC Macro OS HSM.

©Judy Host 2013 | Lens: 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC Macro OS HSM | Aperture: F13.0 | Shutter Speed 1/125sec |  ISO 200 | Focal length 70mm | Exposure mode: Manual Hand Held | Processed in Photoshop with a soft focus filter to soften the skin.

Recently, while I was in Salt Lake City I had a chance to work with Sigma’s 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC Macro […]

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11.07.2013

Vivid Vizcaya

The exquisitely appointed Vizcaya Museum and Gardens is a photographer’s paradise. The former home of businessman James Deering, who made his fortune manufacturing agricultural machinery, is filled with architecture begging for megapixels of detail, super wide angle views, and impeccable HDR techniques.

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10.25.2013

On Safari in Tanzania

© 2013 Roman Kurywczak | Lens: Sigma 300-800mm | Aperture:  f/8 | Focal length: 536mm | Shutter speed: 1/1000 sec. | ISO 800

I have been blessed to be able to travel to some spectacular places and people always ask me what my […]

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10.24.2013

Prime Lenses for Mirrorless Interchangeable cameras

While I am a dedicated believer in using a tripod; this lightweight combination makes handheld glamorous portraits easy with no sacrifice in quality. © 2013 Kevin Ames | Lens: 60mm F2.8 DN | Focal Length: 60mm | Shutter speed: 1/160 sec | Aperture: f16 | ISO: 100

A year ago I purchased a 24 megapixel Sony NEX-7 to use as a backup camera during a trip to Belgium, Germany and France. I carried Sigma’s 19mm and 30mm f/2.8 prime lenses. The quality of the photographs amazed me every evening when I downloaded the day’s take. Those results made me carry my “big boy” Canon 5D Mark 2 less than I’d originally planned. The professional quality coupled with it’s touristy—amateur look, I was never questioned in museums, cathedrals, gardens or when I was doing street shooting.

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10.22.2013

“Go Wide”- Utilizing Extreme Wide Angle Lenses for Impact

© 2013 Lindsay Adler | Lens: Sigma 12-24mm| Camera: Canon 5D Mark II | Focal Length: 21 | Shutter speed: 1/100 sec | Aperture: f/5.6 | ISO: 400

One way to create eye-catching imagery is to break the rules. When you shatter these rules, you stop people in their tracks! One of the first rules of portrait and fashion photography I learned was to NOT use a wide angle lens when photographing people. I was told this would distort their features and be unflattering to the model. But what if you use the wide angle on purpose to distort and exaggerate a scene? Then it creates visual interest and impact. Now your images stand out and become memorable.

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10.17.2013

Setting up the Session with Sigma’s 24-70mm F2.8 EX DG HSM

©Judy Host 2013 | Lens: 24-70mm F 2.8 IF EX DG HSM | Aperture: F/3.2 | Shutter speed:  1/640sec | ISO 160 Focal length 58.0mm | Available light  Processed in PhotoShop CC

Many times in my career I’ve had to work in locations I’ve never seen before. During that time I’ve had maybe 20 minutes to figure out where I’m going to set up my session. Whether I’m teaching a workshop/seminar or even with my new clients, it certainly gets my adrenaline working. This article is about the steps I take to make this successful.
First and foremost, the placement of my subjects has to do with the light as always. I’m driven by the quality of light available to me as well as the direction and location of where the light is coming from. Sometimes I will actually test out the light before photographing if possible so that I can see for myself what it looks like on the subject. I’m always looking for the light that will be the most pleasing for my client.

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10.10.2013

How to Control Extremely High Contrast Scenes

©2013 Robert O'Toole | Female crab spider on Cosmos. South Coast Botanical Gardens, RPV, California. Lens: Sigma 105mm f/2.8 OS macro lens | Nikon D800E | Shutter speed: 1/200 sec | Aperture:  f/8 | ISO 200. Monopod and Jobu tilt head. Nikon SB-R200 Wireless Speedlight in manual mode 1/5 power with diffuser.

Photographing in the field in contrasty harsh light is something every photographer has to deal with. This is a technique that I use for those difficult high contrast situations. For a more natural looking image you need to take control of the light to handle the light and dark tones in a high contrast image.

It is important to understand the problem with high contrast scenes. Exposing for the light tones will cause the darker tones to underexpose and exposing for the darks will result in blown out highlights.

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10.08.2013

Playing in the Sand: Part Two

In “Playing in the Sand: Part One,” I discussed how to turn a cloudy day on the beach into an exploration of photographic possibilities. I showed that each wave follows a different pattern on the beach, allowing photographers to experiment with their own seascape themes and variations.

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10.03.2013

Playing in the Sand: Part One

While I usually preach getting low to create unusual angles, with wave photography raising your tripod to head-height allows the swirling water to occupy a large percent of the image area. Nikon D800E. Sigma 24-70mm F2.8 IF EX DG HSM lens. f/16, 1 second. ISO 200. Sigma 82mm Circular DG Polarizer Filter. Gitzo GT2451EX tripod with Gitzo ball head. Processed in Photoshop CS5, Nik Viveza plug-in applied. Photo © 2013 David FitzSimmons. All rights reserved.

Have you ever risen early in the morning for a sunrise photo shoot only to be faced with fog? Often a feeling of disappointment sets in; I suggest, however, that such moments are full of opportunities—chances to try something new.

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