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Category: Sigma Pro
06.10.2014

How to Pose Couples

©2014 Lindsay Adler | Lens:  Sigma 85mm 1.4 DG HSM | Aperture: F2.2 | Camera: Canon 5D Mark III

As a portrait and wedding photographer, you have got a lot to think about and have a lot of responsibility. You must consider exposure, composition, lighting, lens choice, flattering the subject and posing. On an engagement session or wedding you are capturing one of the most important days of a person’s life. Now, add on top of that you may have a very limited time to capture these images! It is a lot to think about!

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05.31.2014

Photographing with Sigma’s new 50mm F1.4 DG HSM I A

©Judy Host 2014 | Lens: 50mm F1.4 DG HSM I A | Aperture: F2.0 | Shutter speed: 1/125sec | ISO 400 | Manual Mode – Window Light | Make up and Hair by Jennie Carroll | Stylist – Judy Host

The new Sigma 50mm F1.4 DG HSM I A is the ideal lens for portrait photography in natural or low light situations.

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05.19.2014

Photographing the Nighttime Landscape with Sigma’s 12-24mm lens

I have been photographing nighttime landscapes for about 20 years now capturing images of star trails like the one pictured […]

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05.16.2014

On Location in Alaska with the Sigma 18-250mm OS

On a recent trip to Alaska I brought along a lens on loan from Sigma, the 18-250mm F3.5-6.3 DC OS MACRO […]

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05.13.2014

How to Photograph Using Reflective Light

Sachi4972

As a natural light photographer there comes a time when even the best of us struggle with finding the right […]

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05.06.2014

How Your Camera Sees: Part 1

©2014 Lindsay Adler |Subject has hips pushed backwards away from camera. | Sigma 24-70mm lens at 60mm, Canon 5D Mark III

As a photographer, I am definitely a problem solver. I must solve endless problems including lighting, posing, and flattering my subject. One way to become a better problem solver is to understand the tools available to us, most importantly, our cameras.

When photographing people and portraits, it is important to understand how your camera and lenses see. When looking through the lens, how does your camera interpret the environment and your subject different than what you perceive with the naked eye? Whether posing and shooting fashion, family portraits or head shots, understanding this makes a profound impact on the final results.

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04.28.2014

How to Create an Action Sequence Image with Sigma’s 120-300mm F2.8

©2014 Robert O'Toole | Lens: 120-300mm F2.8 DG OS HSM | S | Focal Length:  250mm | Camera: Nikon  D4 | Exposure Mode:  manual mode | Shutter speed: 1/4000 sec | Aperture: f/4 | ISO 400 | handheld at water level.

When all the elements fall info place during a photo session you can find yourself a lot more than just a couple of high quality single images but instead can find that you have captured a series of images that illustrates some really interesting action. Combining multiple images into a single action sequence image can give you a creative eye opening image that can really surprise viewers.

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04.23.2014

High School Senior Fashion Session: Seniors Ignite

©2014 Lindsay Adler | Lens: 85mm F1.4 EX DG HSM | Camera: 5D Mark III | Shutter speed: 1/320 sec | Aperture: F2.2 | ISO 200

This February I was invited to join the fast-paced and inspirational conference called Seniors Ignite. The conference, this year hosted outside of Las Vegas, focused specifically on senior portrait photography and all elements involved– lighting, posing, business, inspiration and more! The event helps elevate senior portrait photography through lecture by those leading the industry and also a great deal of hands-on shooting through their senior model program.

High school seniors around the country can apply to be part of the program through their host studio, and a limited number are selected to come to the event and be photographed in fashion-editorial style shoots at the annual conference.

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04.21.2014

How to utilize 5 lenses for a boudoir shoot

The area around the bed is very tight in my studio so I almost always use the 50mm. It allows me to get full body shots and close up shots with ease.  © 2014 Jen Rozenbaum | Lens: 50mm | Aperture: F3.5 | Shutter speed: 1/125 sec

There is one question that is asked of me most often when I am teaching photography. That question is “Which lens is your favorite”? That’s such a terribly difficult question for me to answer. Lenses are like children, I love them all and hate to play favorites.

All kidding aside, I carry 5 lenses with me everywhere I go. Sigma’s 35mm F1.4, 50mm F1.4, 85mm F1.4, 24-70mm F2.8 and the 70-200mm F2.8. Most of my boudoir shoots are done in studio. My studio is very small (about 10’x10’) so I most often shoot with my 50mm due to size constraints. What if I want to take my client out to the rooftop though? (I’m bringing out the 70-200mm for that!) or into the vestibule (only the 24-70mm will do there). I would be unprepared without the other lenses.

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04.07.2014

Photographing in Manual Mode to create Beautiful Exposures

©Judy Host 2014 | Lens: 70-200mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM | Aperture: F 7.1 | Shutter speed: 1/320sec | ISO 320 | Focal length 80mm| Exposure: manual mode | Processed in Photoshop using Perfectly Clear by Authentic to add a bright and more saturated look.

Learning to use manual settings in your camera will provide you with the ability to create the beautiful exposures you desire. The exposure in your camera is determined by several different settings. Exposure refers to the lightness or darkness of the image. The settings are: 1) the aperture, the lens opening, which lets in light and controls the depth of field; 2) the shutter speed, the speed by which the lens lets in light, and 3) the ISO, which controls the camera’s sensitivity to light. The right combination of these three settings will give you a nearly perfect exposure and give you the effect you want for your image.

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