The Blog: See what
Sigma is saying.

04.24.2015

Inspiration is everything in photography.  Most photographers didn’t get into photography because we loved sitting behind a computer or because we loved sitting in a darkroom.  We got into photography because we saw something that inspired us.  Whether that was a National Geographic Magazine article that took us first-hand into some remote part of the world or because we grew up next to a father or grandfather that taught us about the craft, there was something that inspired us.

© 2015 Ryan Brown

© 2015 Ryan Brown

As a portrait photographer I find it particularly important to find something that balances work with pleasure.   After day-in-day-out photographing for clients, it is important to re-ignite our inner passion for photography.  I remember as a child looking at the National Geographic Magazine and wondering what it would be like to travel the world and interact with these different cultures that they document.   This was the inner fire that drove me to become a photographer.

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04.17.2015

In the last few weeks I have had the chance to travel with Sigma’s 18-35mm F1.8 lens to New Jersey, Las Vegas and Chicago.  The lens was put through the tests on a Canon 7D, 50D, and 60D.  I was so intrigued by the lens that as a full-frame shooter, I went and found a cropped sensor camera just to use it.  It was well worth it.

While in Las Vegas, I made a point to only use this lens on the Canon 50D.  The results were amazing!  Here you can see two black and white images made with the combination.  The first is a portrait of Danny, a shop worker in Nevada.  This image was photographed at 18mm at 1/200sec at f/1.8 and ISO 800.  This image shows incredibly crisp detail and textures at the lenses widest aperture.  The next image is of an old desk in a barn in Nevada.  This image was photographed at 23mm 1/30sec at f/1.8 and ISO100.  This image shows details so crisp that the fine texts in various parts of the image are readable.

© 2015 Ryan Brown

© 2015 Ryan Brown

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04.15.2015

The Sigma team was in Pasadena, California for the annual Professional Photographers of California for their Pro Photo Expo.  The weather was great and the temperature was hot both outside and on the tradeshow floor in the 30-foot Sigma booth.  The wonderful model Jennie was on-site for the 3-day show for photographers to try out any of the Sigma lenses or the Sigma dp Quattro cameras.

© 2015 Ryan Brown

© 2015 Ryan Brown

As a Sigma Technical Representative, I was able to get my hands on the brand-new Sigma dp3 Quattro camera and photograph in the booth with it.  If you have followed my first Sigma blog over the Quattro series, you will know that the topic was on aspect ratios and in-camera black and white.  Just like the dp3’s siblings, the body is the same, just a different lens.  This camera includes a 50mm lens to photograph to it’s APS-C size Foveon sensor.  This means that what you have here is really the perfect portrait lens with its 35mm equivalent being 75mm.

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04.14.2015

I just received a Sigma’s new prime lens, the 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM | Art lens, so I thought I’d take it for a spin. What better way to test a fast prime than on a fast dog?

To capture a fast dog, pull out a fast prime. For Rowan’s spring swim I used Sigma’s new super-fast 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | A. Nikon D800E, Sigma 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | A lens at f/8, 1/2000 sec., ISO 1600. Photo © 2015 David FitzSimmons. All rights reserved.

To capture a fast dog, pull out a fast prime. For Rowan’s spring swim I used Sigma’s new super-fast 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | A. Nikon D800E, Sigma 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | A lens at f/8, 1/2000 sec., ISO 1600. Photo © 2015 David FitzSimmons. All rights reserved.

We  loaded Rowan in the Suby and headed down to Pleasant Hill Lake, which was swelling higher and higher with spring rain. A lakeside campground had become partially inundated with water—a great place to let our pooch swim.

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04.10.2015

Japanese Red-crowned Cranes: Sigma 150-600mm Sports Lens

© 2015 Robert O'Toole | Japanese red-crowned crane pair in a snow storm. Sigma 150-600 Sports lens and Nikon D810 | Shutter speed: 1/30sec | Aperture: f/11 | Focal length:  150mm | ISO 64, EV + 1.3, Manual mode with Auto-ISO, UniqBall UBH 45 head and Jobu Algonquin Carbon Tripod.

© 2015 Robert O’Toole | Japanese red-crowned crane pair in a snow storm. Sigma 150-600 Sports lens and Nikon D810 | Shutter speed: 1/30sec | Aperture: f/11 | Focal length:  150mm | ISO 64, EV + 1.3, Manual mode with Auto-ISO, UniqBall UBH 45 head and Jobu Algonquin Carbon Tripod.

The highlight of any winter time trip to Japan has to be the Japanese red-crowned crane which has the distinction of being not only the rarest crane in the world but also the largest and heaviest on average.

Japanese red-crowned cranes in Hokkaido. © 2015 Robert O'Toole |  All Sigma 150-600 Sports lens and Nikon D810 handheld.

Japanese red-crowned cranes in Hokkaido. © 2015 Robert O’Toole |  All Sigma 150-600 Sports lens and Nikon D810 handheld.

The red-crowned cranes display to help reinforce the pair bond as well as territorial advertisement and agonistic signaling. It always seems to be infectious, once one pair in a group starts, it usually encourages another group to start up than another and another.

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04.09.2015

Snow Monkeys and the Sigma 150-600mm Sports Lens

© 2015 Robert O'Toole | Japanese red-crowned crane pair in a snow storm. Sigma 150-600 Sports lens and Nikon D810 | Shutter speed: 1/30 sec | Aperture: f/11 | Focal length: 150mm | ISO 64, EV + 1.3, Manual mode with Auto-ISO, UniqBall UBH 45 head and Jobu Algonquin Carbon Tripod.

© 2015 Robert O’Toole | Japanese red-crowned crane pair in a snow storm. Sigma 150-600 Sports lens and Nikon D810 | Shutter speed: 1/30 sec | Aperture: f/11 | Focal length: 150mm | ISO 64, EV + 1.3, Manual mode with Auto-ISO, UniqBall UBH 45 head and Jobu Algonquin Carbon Tripod.

Winter is my favorite time of the year to visit Japan and it’s unique wildlife surrounded by unreal snow-covered landscapes. During my annual Japan wildlife tour we always spend a couple of days with the world famous snow monkeys at the volcanic hot springs in the Nagano area.

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04.06.2015
© 2015 Steve Chesler |

© 2015 Steve Chesler |

Shooting hockey tournaments on a regular basis, I consider myself a seasoned veteran on the ins and outs of shooting hockey, such as keeping the equipment up and running in cold rinks and how to adjust for the challenging lighting situations. As experienced as I am with these, I still feel I was caught a little off guard when I agreed to shoot the Great Lakes Girls Hockey League Playoff Tournament at an outdoor twin rink complex in Buffalo in late February.

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04.01.2015

We are pleased to announce Ed Ruth, of Bakersfield, California as our first #SigmaSuperFan! We were very impressed with Ed’s thoughtful approach the the question: “What makes you a Sigma SuperFan?”

Here’s our favorite quote:

“A lens must be more than a pathway for light, to capture my attention; it must have some motivation behind it and that is what I get from Sigma. I have no doubts that the people who engineer and assemble Sigma lenses have a sense of purpose and a drive to demonstrate a love of photograph and service to customers. I didn’t become a Sigma SuperFan out of blind devotion, I became devoted after using Sigma lenses and being pleasantly amazed at the results.”

Ed Ruth, Bakersfield, CA, is our first Sigma SuperFan.

Ed Ruth, from Bakersfield, CA, is our first Sigma SuperFan.

Now retired, Ed Ruth, worked for nearly three decades in the US Department of the Interior in eight different states as a Law Enforcement Ranger in the National Park Service and Bureau of Land Management. He’s published eBooks on building a custom home computer designed to work with today’s high resolution cameras, and he teaches a monthly photo workshops at his local camera store (learn more here.) . A long time photographer, he’s just recently become a #SigmaSuperFan, after purchasing the 10-20mm about two years ago.  He’s now added several more Sigma lenses to his kit, including the 50mm F1.4 | Art and the 18-35mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art.

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04.01.2015

We are choosing a Sigma SuperFan winner every month from April to December. You could be the next! Enter for a chance to win by telling us what motivated you to buy a Sigma product.

Keep scrolling to see an overview of our winners.

April: Congrats to Sigma SuperFan Winner Ed Ruth

Now retired, Ed Ruth, worked for nearly three decades in the US Department of the Interior in eight different states as a Law Enforcement Ranger in the National Park Service and Bureau of Land Management. He’s published eBooks on building a custom home computer designed to work with today’s high resolution cameras, and he teaches a monthly photo workshops at his local camera store (learn more here.) . A long time photographer, he’s just recently become a #SigmaSuperFan, after purchasing the 10-20mm about two years ago.  He’s now added several more Sigma lenses to his kit, including the 50mm F1.4 | Art and the 18-35mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art.

More about Ed

 

Are You a Sigma SuperFan, too? Let us know here!

04.01.2015

This week I point my camera toward a smaller breed. It’s one that’s popular with budget-minded pet owners. Today we’ll photograph wiener dogs, a German breed that dates back to at least 13th Century.

Initially I intended to photograph a neighbor’s wiener dog, but, the truth is, our family fell in love with these diminutive beauties, so we bought one. Or, more precisely, we bought a whole pack of them.

To begin my portrait project, I decided that I wanted to create some high key Curious Critters

My Dad loved his Dachshund as a boy, so we looked into wiener dogs. Turns out, they are much easier to photograph, not to mention care for, than Labs. Here is a high key ‘Curious Critters’ portrait of a single wiener dog. Nikon D800E, Sigma 105mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM Macro lens at f/16, 1/250 sec., ISO 100. Photo © 2015 David FitzSimmons. All rights reserved.

My Dad loved his Dachshund as a boy, so we looked into wiener dogs. Turns out, they are much easier to photograph, not to mention care for, than Labs. Here is a high key ‘Curious Critters’ portrait of a single wiener dog. Nikon D800E, Sigma 105mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM Macro lens at f/16, 1/250 sec., ISO 100. Photo © 2015 David FitzSimmons. All rights reserved.

I began with a wiener side view. In profile, its pleasant appearance is evident, and, with good lighting, it’s classic side burns shine.

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