The Blog: See what
Sigma is saying.

10.30.2011

Eye Scene: Photographer, Ryuichi Oshimoto Travels with Sigma Camera & Lenses

Title Photo: Bryce Canyon in southwestern Utah. From Bryce Point, I gaze across the enormous naturally made Amphitheater and I use the super wide-angle zoom lens to capture the scene.

Camera: SD1 Lens: 8-16mm F4.5-5.6 DC HSMExposure mode: Manual, ISO: 200, White balance: daylight, Shutter speed: 1/200 sec,Aperture: f9.0, Focal length: 14mm

In mid-August, the strong sunlight shines down on the strip of Las Vegas hotels at 11am and the car thermometer read at 102?F. From Las Vegas, I drive north on Freeway 15 for two hours and fill the tank up in Cedar City, Utah. I head east on State Road 14 through Dixie National Forest and as the elevation rose, the temperature fell. Nice, comfortable wind blew through the open car windows. Encountering National Highway 89, I pass through a town named Hatch (at elevation of 6919ft) and I arrive at the 124 mile Scenic Byway 12. There were beautiful vast landscapes on Byway 12, but I refused to stop and I headed 13 miles east. Expecting the summer congestion, I rushed over to the campsite at Bryce Canyon National Park. The campsite had more vacancies than I expected, so I chose a favorable spot and set up tent. I returned to Red Canyon, where if coming from the west on Byway12 it is one of the first places that attracts people.

When I step into Byway 12, I am suddenly surrounded by a red rock world, the Red Canyon.

Camera: SD1 Lens: 85mm F1.4 EX DG HSMExposure mode: Manual, ISO: 200, White balance: daylight, Shutter speed: 1/320 sec,Aperture: f8.0, Focal length: 85mm

In 1875, Mormon settlers moved from Red Canyon to Bryce Canyon, named after Ebenezer Bryce, a Mormon pioneer. I returned to Bryce Canyon and headed to Sunset Point. The large naturally made amphitheater was filled with the afternoon sun.

I stood on Sunset Point (at elevation 8917ft) and look down at the mystical landscape of the clay columns called Hoodoo and jagged rocks.

Camera: SD1 Lens: 85mm F1.4 EX DG HSMExposure mode: Manual, ISO: 200, White balance: daylight, Shutter speed: 1/60 sec,Aperture: f8.0, Focal length: 85mm

Instantly the sunlight was fading and the bit of light shone a small part of the enormous, naturally made amphiteater.

Camera: SD1 Lens: 85mm F1.4 EX DG HSMExposure mode: Manual, ISO: 200, White balance: daylight, Shutter speed: 1/125 sec,Aperture: f9.0, Focal length: 85mm

That night, camping in the national park that was established in 1928, there was no wind and the temperature only decreased slightly, so it was spent comfortably. By the time I woke the next morning, the eastern sky had begun to brighten. When I rushed to Bryce Point, there were people already waiting by the eastern part of the mountain where the light had begun to pour in. After the sunrise, most of the people left, but I stayed and endured through the cold morning breeze.

Standing 8296ft high from Bryce Point. With the red Hoodoo in the background, the white colored Hoodoo basking in the morning light attracted my eye. Setting the camera on the tripod, the morning landscape was captured.

Camera: SD1 Lens: 50mm F1.4 EX DG HSMExposure mode: Manual, ISO: 200, White balance: daylight, Shutter speed: 1/60 sec,Aperture: f9.0, Focal length: 50mm

The morning sun shines on the Bristlecone Pine tree in the largest Amphitheater in the park.

Camera: SD1 Lens: 50mm F1.4 EX DG HSMExposure mode: Manual, ISO: 200, White balance: daylight, Shutter speed: 1/160 sec,Aperture: f8.0, Focal length: 50mm

Returning to the campsite from Bryce Point, I ate a quick breakfast, then folded up the tent and drove south of the park.

Vast fields came into view when driving south from the campsite. I saw a Pronghorn there. I quickly photographed it with the large aperture telephoto zoom lens and when I attempted to get closer, it bolted off.

Camera: SD1 Lens: APO 120-300mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSMExposure mode: Manual, ISO: 200, White balance: daylight, Shutter speed:1/500 sec, Aperture: f5.6, Focal length: 300mm

Aqua Canyon. The red rock canyon is beautiful, but the yellow flowers basking in the morning light is gleaming as well.

Camera: SD1 Lens: 17-50mm F2.8 EX DC OS HSMExposure mode: Manual, ISO: 200, White balance: daylight, Shutter speed: 1/400 sec,Aperture: f6.3, Focal length: 35mm

Ponderosa Canyon. The digital camera faithfully captured the subtle red colors in the rocks.

Camera: SD1 Lens: 17-50mm F2.8 EX DC OS HSMExposure mode: Manual, ISO: 200, White balance: daylight, Shutter speed: 1/250 sec,Aperture: f8.0, Focal length: 35mm

The red color seen on the rock surface at Black Birch Canyon is from the iron. Using the large aperture macro lens, the scene was captured sharply.

Camera: SD1 Lens: APO MACRO 150mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSMExposure mode: Manual, ISO: 200, White balance: daylight, Shutter speed: 1/250 sec, Aperture: f8.0, Focal length: 150mm

I went to Rainbow Point (elevation 9105ft) on the southern most part of the park and from there I drove east on Byway 12 out of the park.

Before returning to Byway12, there were a number of large signposts on the fields. Several horses hid behind the shadows of the signs to avoid the harsh sunlight and one of them approached me.

Camera: SD1 Lens: 8-16mm F4.5-5.6 DC HSMExposure mode: Manual, ISO: 200, White balance: daylight, Shutter speed: 1/500 sec,Aperture: f8.0, Focal length: 11mm

Driving east on Scenic Byway 12, the road cuts across the north of Bryce Canyon National Park. Along the way, captivated by the red rocks on Mossy Cave Trail, I decided to walk on the trail.
In the late 1800’s, in order to eliminate the water shortage, irrigation canals were created to draw water from the Sevier River. As a result, the creek became knee deep and I walk over to the fall.


Walking along the creek, I encounter a waterfall pouring into a red rock world. Using the ultra wide-angle zoom lens while soaking up spray of water, I photographed the red rocks, blue sky and the waterfall streaming on the summer’s dry land.

Camera: SD1 Lens: 8-16mm F4.5-5.6 DC HSM,Exposure mode: Manual, ISO: 200, White balance:daylight, Shutter speed: 1/500 sec, Aperture: f11.0,Focal length: 8mm

When I leave Bryce Canyon, Scenic Byway 12 heads south toward Tropic, a small town.

I got the impression that Tropic was a motel and RV town. I used the compact digital camera to casually snap the photo.

Camera: DP2xExposure mode: Manual, ISO: 200, White balance: daylight, Shutter speed: 1/125 sec, Aperture: f8.0, Focal length:24.2mm

Driving further 5 miles south, I arrive at Cannonville and I grabbed guidebook about Scenic Byway 12 at the visitor center.

Colorful rocks approach and the vast pastures were impressive in Cannonville.

Camera: SD1 Lens: APO 70-200mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSMExposure mode: Manual, ISO: 200, White balance: daylight, Shutter speed:1/800 sec, Aperture: f5.6, Focal length: 70mm

As I drove through Main Street in Cannonville, I saw an old gas pump. The white painted building was bright under the afternoon sun and the view remained in the passerby.

Camera: SD1 Lens: 30mm F1.4 EX DC HSMExposure mode: Manual, ISO: 200, White balance: daylight, Shutter speed: 1/1000 sec, Aperture: f9.0, Focal length: 30mm


In 1948, the National Geographic Society used Kodachrome film to photograph all images for the September 1949 issue of National Geographic magazine. A relatively new brand film at the time, they named this area the Kodachrome Flat. In 1962, this land became a State Park, but fearing the repercussions from Kodak Film Company, it was named Chimney Rock State Park. However a few years later with the permission of Kodak, it was named Kodachrome Basin. This day, there were few people at Kodachrome Basin. Carrying the latest digital camera, I reminisce on the days of Kodachrome film while I walking around the park.


The long rock called the Sand Pipe stands between the multi-colored sandstone created180 million years ago. I speculated whether this is a manmade thing.

Camera: SD1 Lens: 17-50mm F2.8 EX DC OS HSM,Exposure mode: Manual, ISO: 200, White balance:daylight, Shutter speed: 1/500 sec, Aperture: f8.0,Focal length: 35mm

Did this cattle come from one of the neighboring ranches? Many of the cattle I saw in the park were hiding in the shade.

Camera: SD1 Lens: APO 70-200mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSMExposure mode: Manual, ISO: 200, White balance: daylight, Shutter speed:1/1000 sec, Aperture: f5.6, Focal length: 70mm

I look up at Shakespeare Arch basking in the afternoon sun while walking the trails. Thinking of the discontinued Kodachrome film, I used the high quality digital camera to burn the image of the red rock and blue sky.

Camera: SD1 Lens: 17-50mm F2.8 EX DC OS HSM,Exposure mode: Manual, ISO: 200, White balance:daylight, Shutter speed: 1/320 sec, Aperture: f8.0, Focal length: 23mm


I had a choice to turn around at the arch, but I proceeded toward the looped trail. Walking around the higher area of the trail, strong wind blew through the vast acres of land.

Camera: SD1 Lens: 8-16mm F4.5-5.6 DC HSMExposure mode: Manual, ISO: 200, White balance: daylight, Shutter speed: 1/500 sec,Aperture: f8.0, Focal length: 12mm

The west wind was blocked out on the eastern side of the trail where I was walking. In the windless, quiet atmosphere, my shadow was visible in the photograph.

Camera: DP1xExposure mode: Manual, ISO: 100, White balance: daylight, Shutter speed: 1/320 sec, Aperture: f8.0, Focal length: 16.6 mm

Returning to Scenic Byway 12 from Kodachrome Basin State Park, I drove east to Henrieville.


A sleek sign I saw before entering the town of Henrieville.
I thought of staying in the town, but the town was very small and I didn’t see any lodging.

Camera: SD1 Lens: MACRO 70mm F2.8 EX DG,Exposure mode: Manual, ISO: 200, White balance:daylight, Shutter speed: 1/1250 sec, Aperture: f5.6,Focal length: 70mm

Looking back on Scenic Byway 12, I stood in the middle of the road and held the large aperture telephoto zoom lens firmly to photograph the scene.
Raising the contrast, the floating parched grass was emphasized by the afternoon light.

Camera: SD1 Lens: APO 120-300mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM,Exposure mode: Manual, ISO: 200, White balance:daylight, Shutter speed: 1/600 sec, Aperture: f5.6, Focal length: 300mm


After passing the small town of Henrieville, the road leads into a northeastern direction. “Along the way you will also discover that Scenic Byway 12 takes you through memorable landscapes, ranging from the remains of ancient sea beds to one of the world’s highest alpine forests, and from astonishing pink and russet stone turrets to open sagebrush flats. The history and culture of the area blend together, making Scenic Byway 12 a journey like no other.” –A Route Guide to Scenic Byway 12

To further experience the journey according to the guidebook, I headed to Escalante to find accommodation. (Continued to Part II)

*All artwork on this page was processed from RAW data (X3F) with Sigma PhotoPro software. After processing, some selected images were imported into retouching software to remove dust. This photo essay is currently running on Sigma Japan’s site and it is published here two months later

Facebook comments:

No Comment.

Add Your Comment